THE ZOOKEEPER’S WIFE — Review by Cate Marquis

The Zookeeper’s Wife is not only an inspirational true story told through a lush historical film but a women’s cinema trifecta: A female star in the lead role, a woman director and a woman author. The director is Niki Caro, who rose to fame with Whale Rider, another film with a determined female central character, and the film is adapted from Diane Ackerman’s book of the same name. The star is Jessica Chastain, who plays Antonina Zabinska, a little-known hero during the Holocaust, who ran the Warsaw zoo alongside her husband Jan in pre-World War II Poland. When the Nazis invade their country, Antonina and her husband sheltered hundreds of Jewish men, women and children in their home on the zoo grounds, and therefore saved their lives. Read on…

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GET OUT — Review by Martha K. Baker

Jordan Peele wrote and directed “Get Out” with a black man’s humor, understanding, blood, and brains. The result is a film unlike any other and yet quoting many others. Peele honors the horror film with parody and politics. It’s a scary, funny, bloody ballet on point. Anyone who watched Peele with Keegan-Michael Key on their sketch comedy show knows that Peele has talent. But could Peele stretch a sketch into a full-length feature film? Yes. Yes, he could. Peele transcends television. Read on…

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LIFE — Review by Susan Granger

Several years ago, renowned British scientist Stephen Hawking cautioned that contact with alien life could spell disaster for the human race: “If aliens ever visit us, I think the outcome would be much as when Christopher Columbus first landed in America, which didn’t turn out very well for the American Indians.” But Hawking’s grim warning has not deterred cosmic exploration. Read on…

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WILSON — Review by Martha K. Baker

One thing’s for certain: “Wilson” is unlike very many other films out there. Oh, yes, its titular character is a male without the social skills of a Bic — and we’re talking pen, not lighter. Wilson is a man without boundaries or understanding or couth, and, yet, there’s something about him. Maybe that’s because Woody Harrelson portrays Wilson. Harrelson owns him. Harrelson transcends all tendency toward writing off the man — at least, from the perspective of an audience staring at Wilson in two dimensions only. Anybody who lives with a Wilson — or a Sheldon Cooper — knows that life with these misfits falls far from funny often. Read on…

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THE WEEK IN WOMEN: ‘Beauty and the Beast’ sets box office records for female-fueled films – Brandy McDonnell reports

beauty and the beast posterDisney’s live-action remake of “Beauty and the Beast” proved magical, AWFJ’s #MOTW for March 17, has set several box-office records during its first weekend in theaters. The lavish movie-musical version of the fairytale story conjured up an incredible $170 million in North America and $350 million globally. It is the biggest debut of all time for a female-fueled film, proving yet again that female protagonists are strong both on screen and at the box office. The numbers underscore the buying power of women and girls. On Friday, more than 70 percent of ticket buyers were females, with the overall weekend percentage at 60 percent, per Disney’s numbers as cited by The Hollywood Reporter. Read more on THE WEEK IN WOMEN.

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TABLE 19 — Review by Susan Granger

Angst-riddled weddings have always been ripe for satire but this rom-com doesn’t satisfy even the most meager expectations. Eloise McGarry (Anna Kendrick) was supposed to be Maid-of-Honor at her oldest friend’s Midwestern wedding but then the bride’s brother/Best Man, Teddy (Wyatt Russell), breaks up with her – via a text message. So clumsy, insecure Eloise finds herself relegated to a remote section of the reception, seated with the losers that the bridal couple felt obligated to invite but hoped wouldn’t come. Read on…

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National Film Board of Canada aims for gender parity by 2020 — Jennifer Merin reports

nfblogoGovernment Film Commissioner and NFB Chairperson Claude Joli-Coeur announced that the NFB is aiming to achieve gender parity (50 percent) in key creative positions for animated, documentary and interactive works in production as of 2020. The initiative targets editing, cinematography, screenwriting and music composition and includes key creative positions related to animation and immersive/interactive storytelling, where women are decidedly in the minority—positions such as art director, art designer and creative technologist. Read more on THE FEMALE GAZE

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THE BELKO EXPERIMENT — Review by Susan Granger

What does it take to survive at work? That’s the question posed by this psychologically provocative horror/thriller, set in a factory in Bogota, Colombia, where 80 of Belko Industries’ American employees have been relocated. Read on…

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK March 17-24, 2017: BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

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It may be a “tale as old as time,” but there’s plenty that’s new and fresh in Disney’s live-action take on one of folklore’s most enduring opposites-attract stories. First and foremost is Emma Watson as Belle, the independent, book-loving French girl who dreams of “adventure in the great wide somewhere” and ends up the captive of the surly, bitter, cursed Beast (Dan Stevens) after trading her own freedom for her father’s (Kevin Kline). Watson’s Belle is smart, confident, courageous, and feisty — she adds a welcome dash of our beloved Hermione to a character who was already considered one of Disney’s more admirable, self-sufficient princesses. Read on…

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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST – Review by Martha K Baker

beauty and the beast 2 smallThe Disney live-action adaptation of the Disney animation depends on computer-generated imagery. Most viewers do not know Jean Cocteau’s 1946 version or Gabrielle-Suzanne de Villeneuve’s original story, but they surely know Disney’s animated version or the recent stage play. For fans of sparkles and reveals, the other versions may not matter. Fans of Alan Menken’s music may not care about the source material either. In being its own version, this one tries very hard by adding a bit of new music and by casting stars recognizable by voice or bearing. Read on…

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