Whistler Film Festival 2016: Feminism Soars – Jennifer Merin reports

whistler-2016The 16th annual Whistler Film Festival has drawn to a close after five days packed with film screenings, a full house of filmmaker labs and pitch sessions, parties and power skiing. Parity for women is a cause that’s fully embraced by festival director Shauna Hardy Mishaw, who has established partnerships with female focused organizations to train, mentor and promote women directors and producers at the festival. Additionally, femme-helmed films scored big in award wins. Read more>>

read more

THREE TREMBLING CITIES – Review by Martha P. Nochimson

three-trembking-cities​Three Trembling Cities, written and directed by Arthur Vincie, is an innovative web series about immigrants in New York. Wait, don’t run for the exit. It’s not an earnest and/or sentimental diatribe about America as a country of immigrants; or a timely warning against the repulsive policies of Donald Trump, although this is a good time for America to consider its immigrant heritage. ​But the word “immigrant” has become heavy, fraught with anxiety, anger, and melancholy, and Three Trembling Cities is anything but that. Read the full review on EYE ON MEDIA.

read more

MISS SLOANE – Review by MaryAnn Johanson

misssloane-p Miss Sloane is a thriller — a hugely gripping one — about politics and money and lobbying, which someone here deems “the most morally bankrupt profession since faith healing.” It’s about the business of the government of the United States of America as a game of 12-dimensional chess played by smart, ruthless, unelected people backed, for the most part, by the endless and enormous financial resources of multinational corporations. It is sharp and funny, and then depressing and dispiriting. It’s Thank You for Smoking and Wag the Dog with all the satire stripped out and just the crass reality remaining. Read more>>

read more

RULES DON’T APPLY – Review by Susan Granger

Watching this reminded me of when Elizabeth Taylor died. As I was chatting with another critic at a Manhattan screening, the twentysomething publicist asked, “Who’s Elizabeth Taylor?” After years of gestation, Warren Beatty has created an absurdly nostalgic farce about aviation tycoon/film producer Howard Hughes. But do moviegoers remember either of them? Read on…

read more

AWFJ EDA Awards @ Whistler Film Festival 2016: The Winners — Jennifer Merin reports

whistler-2016For the fourth consecutive year, the Alliance of Women Film Journalists was at Whistler Film Festival to present AWFJ EDA Awards to female filmmakers for Best Female-Directed Narrative Feature and Best Female-Directed Documentary. The winners were announced on December 4 at the festival’s awards ceremony at the Maury Young Arts Center. Read on…

read more

Women on Top Summit @ Whistler Film Festival: Keynote Address by Valerie Creighton, Canadian Media Fund

valerie-creightonAt Whistler Film Festival’s spirited Women on Top Summit (held December 3, atop Whistler Mountain), Canada Media Fund’s president and CEO Valerie Creighton affirmed and underscored Canada’s commitment to reach parity for women working in all aspects of the country’s moving image industries. Creighton’s speech provides comprehensive coverage of status and strategies re Canada reaching the goal of gender parity. The entire address is published on THE FEMALE GAZE

read more

JACKIE – Review by Susan Granger

Under the direction of gifted Chilean filmmaker Pablo Larrain, Natalie Portman creates a dazzling cinematic portrait of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy. Read on…

read more

SiREN — Review by Liz Whittemore

siren-poster-202x300Some of the most successful films actually began as brilliant shorts. Alive in Joburg, for one example, became District 9. And, Within The Woods eventually evolved into The Evil Dead. This time around, a short segment within V/H/S is getting its own feature length film. We wonder whether SiREN will be able to lure in the same audience it did in its 2012 origin? Read more on I SCREAM YOU SCREAM

read more

LA LA LAND — Review by Susan Granger

Opening with a fabulous fantasy sequence of morning commuters caught in congested traffic on Los Angeles’ freeways, Damien Chazelle’s dazzling contemporary musical chronicles longing, love and lingering wistfulness. Aspiring actress Mia (Emma Stone) works as a barista at a café on the Warner Brothers’ studio lot, while brooding jazz pianist Sebastian (Ryan Gosling) is tired of playing background music at bars and restaurants. They “meet cute” several times before they actually connect, tapping and twirling to “A Lovely Night.” Read on…

read more

A UNITED KINGDOM – Review by MaryAnn Johanson

unitedkingdomposter Here is a story to drive bigots crazy. And it’s even true. In 1947, Seretse Khama was a young man from the British protectorate of Bechuanaland in southern Africa studying in London when he met Ruth Williams, a young English woman. They fell in love, and that upset all sorts of people for all sorts of reasons. He was black, and she was white, and both their families took issue with their romance for the usual stupid irrational reasons. But the governments of both countries also freaked out. Seretse was heir to the throne of Bechuanaland, and for him to marry a white woman was simply insupportable politically. The people of Bechuanaland would never accept a white woman as their queen, or so it was believed. Read more>>

read more