THE WEEK IN WOMEN: Respect for Maureen O’Hara, Sandra Bullock, Sarah Gavron, Daniel Craig and more – Brandy McDonnell reports

maureen-ohara-in-the-quiet-manWhile we mourn the passing of fiery actress Maureen O’Hara, we look to the need for more women in front of the camera, behind the camera and in the boardroom. Sandra Bullock seconds the spanking of Hollywood for sexism and ageism. Suffragette director Sarah Gavron talks about role models. Kate Winslett to star in biopic of American fashion model, photographer and war correspondent Elizabeth “Lee” Miller. The late Sugar Hill Records co-founder Sylvia Robinson, an influential rap pioneer and producer known as the “Mother of Hip-Hop,” will be the subject of a biopic. And Daniel Craig bonds with Monica Bellucci, his equal in age. Read more in THE WEEK IN WOMEN.

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK October 20: THE DIVINE ORDER

motw logo 1-35Several decades after the Sexual Revolution swept across the United States (and around the world) during the late 1960s, it’s all too easy to gloss over just how earth-shattering a change the movement for greater feminine freedom made in the lives of so many women and their families, and to women’s roles in society. Petra Volpe’s entertaining political dramedy, The Divine Order, tells the story of unstoppable women who defied local traditions and oppressive husbands to fight for greater personal freedom. The film offers a compelling reminder of why we must continue to press forward for women’s rights. Continue reading…

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On Making SEEING IS BELIEVING: WOMEN DIRECT – Guest Post by Filmmaker Cady McClain

cady mcclain headshotCady McClain has been speaking to female directors, chronicling their stories for her serialized documentary, Seeing is Believing: Women Direct. Interviewees include Sarah Gavron, Lee Grant, Meera Menon, Betty Thomas and other accomplished directors, as well as next generation women filmmakers just blazing career paths. Not yet ready for release, Seeing is Believing: Women Direct elucidates skills needed to succeed as a woman director; women mentor women by sharing their experiences via filmed interviews. Here, McClain writes about her filmmaking process, why she’s making this documentary and what she’s learning from doing so. Read more on THE FEMALE GAZE

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AWFJ Movie of the Week, October 20-26: SUFFRAGETTE

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Opening October 23, the AWFJ Movie of the Week is Suffragette, British director Sarah Gavron’s phenomenal portrait of the brave women at the vanguard of the rights to vote campaign in the early 20th century in Britain. Specifically, Gavron and master screenwriter Abi Morgan (Shame, The Iron Lady) have chosen to set their film in the seminal year of 1912 when, disheartened by the lack of progress, movement leader Emmeline Pankhurst (a commanding cameo by Meryl Streep) decreed that words should become action. And so it was that peaceful protest and political machinations turned into guerilla warfare, bands of women creating civil unrest to draw attention to their cause; and, often, ending up behind bars, isolated from their families, subject to the most heinous public shame and physically tortured. Read on…

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SUFFRAGETTE – Review by Susan Granger

Viewed from the 21st century, it’s difficult to imagine a time when women – 50% of the population – were not only denied the right to vote but equality with men on many levels. Held in human bondage, women were considered their husband’s property, along with their children. Read on…

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“Brick Lane” – Maitland McDonagh reviews

Sarah Gavron’s earnest adaptation of Monica Ali’s sprawling novel about a naïve Bangladeshi girl whose arranged marriage takes her far from home is restrained and decorous to a fault. Read more>>

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“Brick Lane” – Cynthia Fuchs reviews

Sarah Gavron’s movie lapses into a series of clichés. Read more>>

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Releasing June 20, 2008

AWFJ highlights films made by and about women

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