Martha K. Baker

I first taught film at Lakeland College in Wisconsin in 1969 and became a professional film reviewer in 1976 in St. Louis, Mo. Through the years, I have reviewed films for the St. Louis Business Journal, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Episcopal Life, and KWMU (NPR), among other outlets. I've reviewed at KDHX radio, my current outlet, for nearly 20 years.

 

Articles by Martha K. Baker

 

LUCKY — Review by Martha K. Baker

Lucky is barely a moving picture, until it is. Watching paint dry involves more neurons at times than watching Lucky. Glaciers grow faster. And, then, just when it appears to defy the “moving” part of moving picture, Lucky perks up, like a corpse that twitches. That makes watching it worthwhile. Lucky is, after all, Harry Dean Stanton’s last film. Continue reading…

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MANOLO: THE BOY WHO MADE SHOES FOR LIZARDS — Review by Martha K. Baker

Manolo balances shoe business with show business. Manolo Blahnik’s name is synonymous with shoes — wild, nose-bleed, calf-lenthening, knee-knocking shoes of amazing construction. Shoes that demand attention and admiration. Shoes whose cost is out of the reach of most women but will forever be connected to Sex and the City if not to anything real. Continue reading…

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VICTORIA AND ABDUL — Review by Martha K. Baker

Victoria and Abdul scores on every point, defining the biopic “based on a true story.” Not one single false step. No blurred foci. Under Stephen Frears’ impeccable direction, Lee Hall’s script, based on Shrabani Basu’s remarkable research, shines into the far back reaches of the theater. The cast, topped by Dame Judi Dench, acquits itself beautifully. Continue reading…

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SHOT — Review by Martha K. Baker

‘Shot’ sticks to clichés. Let’s say you never imagined the results of one gun shot on a community or a couple or a culprit. Let’s say you are woefully ignorant or willfully unlettered in the violent world around you. But, let’s say, you want to learn, to pick up just a skosh of information about the consequences of violence. Plus, you’re open to experimental film. Then, “Shot” is for you. Or for social studies classes of 6th graders for whom clichés are still fresh and discussable. For you and them, “Shot” works. Continue reading…

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TULIP FEVER — Review by Martha K. Baker

I took the loveliest little nap during the screening of “Tulip Fever.” The theater’s temperature was just right, the seat was comfy, and the company was cozy, so I drifted off. When I awoke, I hadn’t missed much in this romance where two lips kiss while tulip prices rise. Continue reading…

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HOME AGAIN — Review by Martha K. Baker

‘Home Again’ squeaks by as “romcom,” almost begging to be made fun of. It encourages the critic in everyone to have a field day with adjectives describing its mediocrity, with phrases applied like plasters to its clumsiness, with capital letters to proclaim its failure as an end-of-summer romantic comedy, known by the conflation “romcom.” Continue reading…

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VICEROY’S HOUSE — Review by Martha K. Baker

‘Viceroy’s House’ lays historical foundation for today. It’s more than half-way through “Viceroy’s House,” a historical look at the partition of India, before the word “oil” leaks out. The film explains so terribly much about then, 1947, as well as now, 2017. And it pays to watch this well-crafted look at that moment over there. Continue reading…

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THE TRIP TO SPAIN — Review by Martha K. Baker

Bottom line: The Trip to Spain is not as good as The Trip or The Trip to Italy, but what do you expect? The comedy team of Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon does not appeal to everyone, but under Michael Winterbottom’s direction, The Trip series also offers food and travel for your delectation. Continue reading…

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WIND RIVER — Review by Martha K. Baker

The moon is full over snowed upon water. The snow is dirtied by time. Red and bloodied by death. This scene begins the shocking, excellent film “Wind River,” named for Wyoming’s only American Indian reservation. Before that scene settles, a marksman has found a teenager. She is dead on the landscape. Continue Reading…

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MENASHE — Review by Martha K. Baker

“All beginnings are hard,” it is written in the Tal-mud. And Menashe is finding life hard since he lost his wife Leah a year ago. His son Rieven has gone to, or been sent to, his mother’s brother’s house to live. Menashe, a hapless, portly Jew, wants his son back. The rabbi of his tightly constrained Hasidic com-munity, shown in tight camera shots, grants Menashe a week to earn his son back. It’s the week before Leah’s memorial, which her brother thinks should be held at his house, not in Menashe’s crowded flat. In that week, Menashe does everything wrong. Continue reading…

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THE GLASS CASTLE — Review by Martha K. Baker

To read of family dysfunction, an alcoholic father slapping his child, an artsy mom not feeding her bairn is one thing. To see it on the screen is so painful as to be avoided. That is the case with “The Glass Castle,” based on the 2005 memoir by Jeannette Walls. Continue reading…

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LANDLINE — Review by Martha K. Baker

The title’s reference to a fading form of communication suggests the decade for “Landline,” that is, the Nineties. But it says nothing about the chief literary device, that of irony, which each of the characters has to deal with in the course of this multi-generational look at cheating. Continue reading…

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THE JOURNEY — Review by Martha K. Baker

The Journey negotiates from war to peace. Two men openly said horrible things about each other during a historical period known ominously as The Troubles. The enemy leaders are forced to journey together in 2006 during the Northern Ireland Peace Accords. Sinn Fein leader Martin McGuinness and Democratic Party pastor, Ian Paisley, are chauffeured to the meeting. Continue reading…

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DESPICABLE ME 3 — Review by Martha K. Baker

‘Despicable Me 3′ delights with cleverness. A lot of animated films have a sinking spell right about the middle, when the plot has been set up, the characters intro- or re-introduced, and the decibel level established but before the boffo end. “Despicable Me 3″ never sinks, which means: forget about taking a little nappy-wappy about mid-way. Continue reading…

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THE HERO — Review by Martha K. Baker

Fans of Sam Elliott will line up to see him star in “The Hero.” For the Sam Elliott Fan Club, the film offers plenty of views of his push broom mustache, the envy of miners throughout Silesia, and of his lanky lenghth, plus the exhilarating sound of that bass voice. But, ‘The Hero’ rides small in the saddle. Continue reading…

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BAND AID — Review by Martha Baker

‘Band Aid’ trembles before troubles. They argue. They bicker. They fight and bare their claws. They are a young married couple with issues. Anna’s a writer who feels like a failure because lesser writers she knows have solid careers. Ben feels maligned by life, and he leaves dirty, filthy, crusty dishes overflowing in their sink. Continue reading…

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ROUGH NIGHT — Review by Martha Baker

From the Changed Mind Department: “Rough Night” is not just a female version of “Hangover.” Yes, there are vulgarities, but women talk dirty, too. Yes, there is bawdiness, but women are fully capable of being nasty. Most of all, “Rough Night” is about women’s true and evolving friendships. ‘Rough Night’ involves spinsters at play. Continue reading…

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I LOVE YOU BOTH — Review by Martha K. Baker

Everyone knows that twins are tight. They sometimes employ a private language, code words. They know each other better than they know others and often have trouble letting anyone else into their twin world. They know better than to exclude others, but they relate so well to one another. That is the case with Donnie and Krystal. Continue reading…

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MEGAN LEAVEY — Review by Martha K. Baker

“Megan Leavey” teaches about a dog’s life. The title is the name of a woman without direction. Leavey is treated poorly by her mother and step-father in a small New York town. She has no where to go. She’s going there fast, fueled by drugs and alcohol. She joins the Marines to get out of town. Once in the corps, even as she trains, Leavey continues making poor decisions. As punishment, she is sent to the kennels to clean dog poop. Continue reading…

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CHURCHILL — Review by Martha K. Baker

“Churchill” bombasts toward D-Day! What does an old soldier who remembers his infamous failure in an earlier war do when his country and its allies’ generals are ready to mount a major attack? That’s the question that the excellent film “Churchill” ponders regarding the Prime Minister of England in the run-up to D-Day. Continue reading…

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THE WEDDING PLAN — Review by Martha K Baker

weddibg plan poster‘The Wedding Plan’ toasts the bride-to-be. Watch Noa Koler. She plays the bride-to-be in Rama Burshtein’s “The Wedding Plan.” You’ll see why she won Israel’s Ophir Award for Best Actress. She has comic chords within her, but she plays the role of the bride with serious intention — really, the only way in this delightful film. Michal has been dis-engaged by her fiancé very soon after she insisted he tell her why he was blue. The break-off occurs within weeks of their up-coming nuptials, but being an Orthodox Jew and believing strongly that God has a plan for her, Michal, does not cancel the wedding, planned for the last night of Hanukkah. By God, Michal is going to be married. Continue reading…

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SNATCHED – Review by Martha K. Baker

‘Snatched’ fits the pattern for gross-out movies. Eight joke ops. Count ‘em: eight. Some produce outright laughter; others just acknowledge that a joke landed. But that’s it for laughlines in Amy Schumer’s latest film, “Snatched.” Add to that some pretty smarmy stereotyping, and even the feminist device of a mother/daughter plot barely balances the grossness. Continue reading…

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THE DINNER — Review by Martha K. Baker

Oren Moverman, the brilliant director of “The Messenger,” displays his talents as writer and director in “The Dinner.” Some viewers might see the plot, written by Moverman and based on Herman Koch’s novel, as far too complex. However, Moverman teases the complexities apart with striking effect. Continue reading…

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A QUIET PASSION — Review by Martha K. Baker

Anyone who knows anything about Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) knows she led a circumspect life. Her passions were banked, her circle small, and her relationships few. For years, she was often the only female in anthologies of American literature, and she still reigns supreme among her sisters and brothers in the canon. Continue reading…

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THEIR FINEST — Review by Martha K. Baker

Their Finest is a nicknamed title for this movie history. It whispers of Winston Churchill’s history, entitled Their Finest Hour, and cuts into the title of Lissa Evans’ novel on which Gaby Chiappe based, Their Finest Hour and a Half. That title suggests whimsy, but the movie exceeds persiflage. Continue reading…

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