Martha K. Baker

I first taught film at Lakeland College in Wisconsin in 1969 and became a professional film reviewer in 1976 in St. Louis, Mo. Through the years, I have reviewed films for the St. Louis Business Journal, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Episcopal Life, and KWMU (NPR), among other outlets. I've reviewed at KDHX radio, my current outlet, for nearly 20 years.

 

Articles by Martha K. Baker

 

GET OUT — Review by Martha K. Baker

Jordan Peele wrote and directed “Get Out” with a black man’s humor, understanding, blood, and brains. The result is a film unlike any other and yet quoting many others. Peele honors the horror film with parody and politics. It’s a scary, funny, bloody ballet on point. Anyone who watched Peele with Keegan-Michael Key on their sketch comedy show knows that Peele has talent. But could Peele stretch a sketch into a full-length feature film? Yes. Yes, he could. Peele transcends television. Read on…

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WILSON — Review by Martha K. Baker

One thing’s for certain: “Wilson” is unlike very many other films out there. Oh, yes, its titular character is a male without the social skills of a Bic — and we’re talking pen, not lighter. Wilson is a man without boundaries or understanding or couth, and, yet, there’s something about him. Maybe that’s because Woody Harrelson portrays Wilson. Harrelson owns him. Harrelson transcends all tendency toward writing off the man — at least, from the perspective of an audience staring at Wilson in two dimensions only. Anybody who lives with a Wilson — or a Sheldon Cooper — knows that life with these misfits falls far from funny often. Read on…

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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST – Review by Martha K Baker

beauty and the beast 2 smallThe Disney live-action adaptation of the Disney animation depends on computer-generated imagery. Most viewers do not know Jean Cocteau’s 1946 version or Gabrielle-Suzanne de Villeneuve’s original story, but they surely know Disney’s animated version or the recent stage play. For fans of sparkles and reveals, the other versions may not matter. Fans of Alan Menken’s music may not care about the source material either. In being its own version, this one tries very hard by adding a bit of new music and by casting stars recognizable by voice or bearing. Read on…

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KEDI — Review by Martha K. Baker

If all you know of cats is what you see on Facebook, you will be amazed by “Kedi.” If what you know about cats comes from your resident feline, you will be soothed and assured by “Kedi.” This documentary explores the world of cats in Istanbul, where they reign and roam. ‘Kedi’ offers feline philosophy in Istanbul Read on…

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THE OTTOMAN LIEUTENANT — Review by Martha K. Baker

It’s wrong to complain about a movie for not being what you want, but it’s hard to desist with “The Ottoman Lieutenant.” The film is set during a provocative time in history, 1914, in Turkey. Yet, The Ottoman Lieutenant offers little understanding of the time or the place nor of history. The Ottoman Lieutenant is busy being a romance. One spunky nurse, Lillie, her parents unhappy with her chosen profession, attends a lecture conducted by a medical missionary stationed in Anatolia, Turkey. Have Lillie offer her dead brother’s truck to Dr. Jude for medical supplies; have him say no, can’t get the truck to Turkey; have her say, pluckily, I’ll bring it. Read on…

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A UNITED KINGDOM — Review by Martha K. Baker

A United Kingdom makes the most of a titbit of history. Aspects of this true story connect to all sorts of history well known, yet little of its history is known. This is a connect-the-dots history. The time is 1947. The places are foggy London and dusty Africa in the country now known as Botswana. The crown prince, Seretse Khama, has been studying in London to be the next king of his country when he falls in love with a woman. He’s very African black, and she’s very British white. His family, headed by the uncle who raised him, does not want her; and her family does not want him. Nothing dissuades them, but a lot, including England and Winston Churchill, can stop them from assuming their crowns. Read on…

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OSCAR Nominated Live Action Shorts — Review by Martha K. Baker

There’s not a bad seed in this barrel of apples. All five, mostly a half-hour each, offer resounding stories, well told and acted and filmed. They come from France, Hungary, Switzerland, Denmark, and Spain. Two of them swirl around the predicament of refugees in Europe.

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OSCAR Nominated Animation Shorts — Review by Martha K. Baker

“Short” is right. Most of these films run fewer than 10 minutes with one longer than a half-hour. And “sweet” is right, too, in a way, if “sweet” stretches to mournful. The Oscar-nominated Short films advance the concept of brevity as good and worthy. Read on…

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A DOG’S PURPOSE — Review by Martha K. Baker

Yes, the dogs are cute, and, yes, the dogs’ boys are cute. Yes, dogs were coerced to enter freezing cold, roiling water for a scene. And, yes, “A Dog’s Purpose” avoids the tear-jerker aspect by sidesteping the problem with dead dogs in a film by having this one reincarnated. The dog’s name is Bailey. His boy Ethan convinces Mom, who convinces mean, drunken dad that the boy needs a dog. Read on…

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THE COMEDIAN — Review by Martha K. Baker

In 2000, Robert De Niro proved he could be funny in “Meet the Parents.” Before that, he was a heavy, an ACT-OR in films like “Goodfellas” and “The Godfather.” In “The Comedian” he proves that he can be part comedian/part tragedian. The result, however, is more leaden than light. “The Comedian” kills, but not in a good way. Read on…

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SILENCE — Review by Martha K. Baker

A film that runs two hours and 41 minutes can be criticized for being too long. When that film is about torture, it invites jokes about torture to the backside. “Silence” is that film. However, despite its length, Silence is a stunning, unforgettable, even timely film about the Martyrs of Japan, whose feast day is Feb. 6. This is Martha Baker with a KDHX film review of Silence. Read on…

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THE FOUNDER — Review by Martha K. Baker

The Founder dusts the surface of business. In the fully competent hands of director John Lee Hancock, who also directed The Blind Side and Saving Mr. Banks, The Founder tells the story of Ray Kroc, the putative founder of McDonald’s. The film is entertaining but not revelatory enough. There’s little doubt an even more horrifying story lies beneath. This is Martha Baker with a KDHX film review of The Founder. Read on…

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20TH CENTURY WOMEN — Review by Martha K. Baker

20th Century Women bores into behavior. The title’s all wrong, far too sweeping, and a little misleading. For one thing, how the three women referred to in the title represent a century’s worth of women is ungraspable. For another, the character played by Annette Bening so dominates the story that 20th Century Woman is a truer title. This is Martha K. Baker with a KDHX film review of 20th Century Women Read on…

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