AWFJ EDA Awards for Best of 2016

moonlight-posterThe women of AWFJ have voted!

Moonlight is the big winner in this year’s tenth annual AWFJ EDA Awards, garnering awards in seven categories. AWFJ voters show love for esteemed director/activist Ava DuVernay with three EDAs. Manchester By The Sea won two. EDAs went to a diverse array of talents in 13 additional categories, including Bravest Performance, Actress Most in Need of a New Agent and the coveted AWFJ Hall of Shame Award. Read on…

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BRIDGET JONES’ S BABY — Review by Susan Granger

The long-awaited third installment begins as charmingly awkward, accident-prone Bridget (Renee Zellweger) is celebrating her 43rd birthday – alone, once again – with Celine Dion’s “All By Myself.” A funeral flashback reveals that Bridget’s caddish boss, Daniel Cleaver (Hugh Grant), has died and her longtime lover, successful barrister Mark Darcy (Colin Firth), is married to a woman named Camilla. Read on…

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BRIDGET JONES’S BABY – Review by MaryAnn Johanson

bridgetbabyposter Bridget Jones — the woman who once served blue plastic soup to her friends, isn’t that adorable? — is back. God help us. She is 43 years old, and both unmarried and childless, which many women would consider a blessing. But not Bridget Jones! She continues to fret about being a “spinster” and a “barren husk,” because in her head, the year is 1953, or maybe even 1853, and not 2016. She worries about coming across to men as a “verbally incontinent old maid”; she really does believe that the ideal woman is young, married, and keeps her mouth shut. While it is true that there are people in the world who hold to such nonsense — including, shockingly, some women! — the self-hatred it takes for a woman to apply this to herself is not endearing. Read more>>

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AWFJ Movie of the Week, September 12 – September 16: Bridget Jones’s Baby

bridget jones's baby posterBridget Jones, patron saint of single ladies is back. Long before the film entered theatres, it had picked up a small firestorm of controversy over its star’s changed appearance. Variety critic Owen Gleiberman shot himself, repeatedly, in the foot as he tried to maintain that Zellweger’s face was, in some fashion, a betrayal of ordinary beauty that had vaulted her to fame in the first two films. Read On…

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