Where Are All the Diverse Voices in Film Criticism? – Chaz Ebert comments

movie watchersMeryl Streep’s use of the word “infuriating” to describe the disproportionate ratio of male to female reviewers on the Rotten Tomatoes is apt. But the need for diverse voices in film criticism does not suffice with gender. A wide spectrum of voices is critical in challenging the mainstream white male-dominated narrative that drives much of Hollywood and the popular media. Being introduced to diverse critical voices and opinions in the arts not only affects how we see the world but also has a profound influence on how we begin to heal it. Read more>>

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Many Deaths and Nine Lives of Film Criticism – Carrie Rickey comments

Like the movies themselves, movie criticism has migrated from analog to digital. Some thoughts. Read more>>

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2008 EDA Awards Winners!

With sincerest appreciation of all the great work that�s been done in film this year, the Alliance of Women Film Journalists is pleased to announce the winners of the 2007 EDA Awards.

For a full list of 2007 EDA Award nominees, click here.

Congratulations to all!

And the winners are:

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“The End Of America ” – Jennifer Merin reviews

The End Of America presents a ten step blueprint that Hitler (and other dictators) used to subvert due process and curtail personal freedoms, and compares, step by step, events preceding establishment of the Third Reich with what’s occured in the United States during the past eight years. Convincing. Scary. Should be required viewing for those old enough to vote or join the army.

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“Who Does She Think She Is?” Hits Oklahoma City – Brandy McDonnell reviews

From Amelia Earhart to Emily Dickinson to Georgia O’Keeffe, many of the greatest women achievers in U.S. history have something in common: They had no children.

The new documentary “Who Does She Think She Is?” follows five women artists as they strive to balance their family lives, including children, with creative endeavors and economic realities.Read more>>

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Releasing December 3 and 5, 2008

AWFJ highlights films made by and about women

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“Milk” – Joanna Langfield reviews

Gus Van Sant’s stunning drama may push buttons you didn’t even know you had.

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“Milk” – Jennifer Merin comments

“Milk,” Gus Van Sant’s quasi-documentary biopic about Harvey Milk, the first openly gay man to be elected to public office in the United States, should add fuel to the flames ignited by California’s recent ban on gay marriage. Read more>>

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“Milk” – Susan Granger reviews

“Have bullhorn, will travel”could have been gay civil rights activist Harvey Milk’s mantra, instead of “I’m Harvey Milk — and I’m here to recruit you.”Whatever the rhetoric, Milk’s message was a simple one of respect, equality and hope.

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“Australia” – Joanna Langfield reviews

Baz Luhrman’s sweeping romantic adventure is packed to the gills with something for everyone. And, like that wise old adage, this hugely ambitious epic proves, while you can please some of the people some of the time, you can’t please all of them all the time.

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“Australia” – Susan Granger reviews

In one of the most ambitious, exciting filmmaking feats of the year, Baz Luhrmann has created a compelling, romantic frontier adventure that is, in its weight and grand ambition, on the epic scale of “Gone With the Wind.”

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“Australia” – Brandy McDonnell reviews

Director/producer/co-writer Baz Luhrmann’s long-awaited film “Australia” plays a bit like an Aussie version of “Gone With the Wind”: lushly beautiful, melodramatically epic and nearly as long as the Civil War. Read more>>

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“Australia” – Lexi Feinberg reviews

Bigger isn’t better when it comes to Baz Luhrman’s large-scale, over-budget failure Australia. Read more>>

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“Four Christmases” – Susan Granger reviews

While I rarely issue parental warnings, there’s a scene in this PG-13 holiday-themed romantic comedy in which the verisimilitude of Santa Claus is not only questioned but denied. I’d hate to think parents would inadvertently bring youngsters, only to have them disillusioned in such a crass, tactless way.

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Releasing November 26, 2008

AWFJ highlights films made by and about women:

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“Twilight” Author Stephenie Meyers – Brandy McDonnell Interviews

Stephenie Meyer’s path to becoming the worldwide best-selling writer of the “Twilight” series started with a dream. Read more>>

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“Twilight” – Susan Granger reviews

“Twilight Saga,” Stephanie Meyer’s fang-and-blood series of four best-selling young-adult books, tells the mushy tale of Isabella “Bella” Swan (Kristen Stewart), a shy, sensitive adolescent teenager

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“Twilight” – Brandy McDonnell reviews

The modestly budgeted film adaptation of “Twilight” doesn’t have quite the bite of Stephenie Meyer’s addictive novels. But the legions of fans of the phenomenally popular four-book series should be thrilled with the movie, which remains faithful to the first novel without being handcuffed to it. Read more>>

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“Twilight” – Lexi Feinberg reviews

There’s something about doomed love affairs that gets people all aflutter, whether it’s Romeo and Juliet or Jack and Rose or even Ryan and Reese. read more>>

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“Harvard Beats Yale 29-29″ – Jennifer Merin reviews

Kevin Rafferty, filmmaker and Harvard grad, uses archival footage and interviews with team members to ‘replay’ the legendary football game in which the undefeated teams of Harvard and Yale battled it out for the 1968 season’s final victory.Read more>>

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“Bolt” – Susan Granger reviews

Since he was a tiny puppy, all a little white hound named Bolt (voiced by John Travolta) has ever known is being acclaimed as a ‘superdog’ on television sound stage and ‘saving’ his owner and devoted co-star Penny (voiced by Miley Cyrus) from danger. (Think “Lassie” or, better yet, “Rin Tin Tin.”) So when he’s accidentally shipped off to New York City alone, he’s stunned and confused to discover there’s a real world out there.

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Releasing November 21, 2008

AWFJ highlights films made by and about women:

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“Quantum of Solace” – Joanna Langfield reviews

Call me sentimental, but I guess I just like my Bond shaken, not stirred.

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“Quantum of Solace” – Jennifer Merin comments

As underpinning to the 22nd Bond’s highly anticipated high octane chases and fight sequences rife with bloodied bodies, 2008′s 007 slickly delivers to the bad guys–and to us, for that matter–a fundamental and important message: you can’t drink a can of motor oil. Read more

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“Quantum of Solace” – Susan Granger reviews

This 22nd installment in the James Bond franchise is its first sequel, taking up an hour after “Casino Royale.” Arriving in Sienna, Italy, during the famous Palio horse race, Bond (Daniel Craig) discovers that mysterious Mr. White (Jesper Christensen), whom he shot in the leg before the closing credits, is just a cog in a complex global criminal conspiracy

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