MIDNIGHTERS — Review by Liz Whittemore

Midnighters posterMoral questions arise on a daily basis but it’s our seemingly obvious decisions that make us good people. When two people get married they vow to love one another in sickness and health, for richer or poorer, for better or worse. They essentially promise to be faithful in morality to one person for the rest of their time on Earth. IFC Midnight brings us the new film Midnighters with a whole slew of what if’s and how far would you go for the one you love. While driving home from a New Year’s Eve party, Lindsey and Jeff’s already strained marriage is tested again and again when they hit a man with their car and must figure out what to do with him. At the heart of the film, greed, and self-preservation are the motivating factors that send this couple into a tailspin of horror. Continue reading on I SCREAM YOU SCREAM.

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CRIMSON PEAK – Preview by Liz Whittemore

Crimson-Peak-poster-200x300With Guillermo del Toro‘s fascination for Gothic horror, Crimson Peak should be right up his aesthetic alley, along with his other iconic films Pan’s Labyrinth and The Devil’s Backbone. While del Toro has also delved into the sci-fi and comic book world with the Hellboy films (soon to be a trilogy) and Blade II, his eye for fantasy and horror is really his forte. Judging from the recently released trailer, Crimson Peak promises to be a great addition to del Toro’s filmography. Read more and watch the trailer>>

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THE HUMAN CENTIPEDE 3 (Final Sequence) – Liz Whittemore comments

humancentipedeposterWriter/Director Tom Six has given us two films that made us sick to our stomachs. The third and final installment of The Human Centipede trilogy is just about ready for release. There’s a whole lot of Human Centipede 3 pre-release hype that’s preparing us to puke again. But is anyone truly ready for the full repeat (and more) of Human Centipede blood and gore? Read on…

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GONE GIRL: Selling Scary in A Digital Age – Liz Whittemore comments

gone girl save amyA film’s ad campaign can make or break its theatrical run. Oftentimes, the entire plot of a film is laid out in its trailer. If the film is a comedy, all the best jokes are already available in a 2:30 minute television spot. Horror trailers, on the other hand, must be carefully edited so as not to give away too much of the story. We hope for a seductive plot twist, but also keep our fingers crossed that the trailer doesn’t reveal all the scares. Ad campaigns are seemingly straight forward with very few exceptions, but the marketers of Gone Girl broke the mold with a campaign that was full of surprises and created a new frontier in the selling of scary. Read more…

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Park Chan Wook Discusses Genre Twists in THIRST – Jennifer Merin interviews

park chan wook jerusalem ff cropped160At his Jerusalem Film Festival Masterclass, the Korean master filmmaker talks about how his life in 1980s Korea inspired Thirst, his genre bending vampire movie. This, he says, is his personal favorite among all of his films to date. He comments that he identifies with the film’s central character, a priest-turned-vampire, because he’s always trying to justify his decisions and actions. His revelations about audience manipulation through sound design are particularly fascinating. Read more>>

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THIRST (Blu-ray) – Review by Kimberly Lindbergs

Few film subjects have been as exploited, examined and scrutinized as vampires. These blood sucking monsters are a favorite topic of horror filmmakers and fans, morbid romantics and angst-ridden pubescent teens. In recent years the vampire genre has lost some of its bite thanks to a spate of predictable and tired films made for kids and undiscriminating adults. But during the 1970s, a particularly inventive and pivotal decade for vampires in cinema, audiences were treated to an abundance of creative movies and telefilms that reimagined, subverted and deconstructed vampire legend and lore. This is one such film. Read more

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KILL LIST – Review by Kimberly Lindbergs

While most modern horror films are marketed at teenagers, Kill List is made with adults in mind, and seasoned horror fans should find the ride particularly satisfying. It’s a film that defies expectations and relishes its ambiguity by playing fast and hard with genre tropes that we’ve all become much too familiar with. Director Ben Wheatley understands that real terror stems from our fear of the unknown and unexpected, so his film asks questions of its audience instead of answering them. Read more>>.

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AWFJ Women On Film – Catherine Hardwicke and Amanda Seyfried – Tricia Olszewski interviews

In Catherine Hardwicke’s “Red Riding Hood,” the titular character of the classic fairy tale is no longer referred to as an item of clothing: Her name is Valerie. And she’s all grown up, torn between the man she loves and the man she’s been arranged to marry, her emotions further taxed as her town battles a werewolf. Amanda Seyfried, blessed with a fairy-tale face, plays Valerie and here talks with her director about the look of the film, its modern touches, and why Valerie is far from a damsel in distress.

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AWFJ Women On Film – “Piranha 3D” – Review by Susan Granger

“No one ever went broke underestimating the taste of the American public.”

Social critic/journalist H.L. Mencken (1880-1956)

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Women On Film – “Friday the 13th” – Susan Granger reviews

It doesn’t take a genius to realize why campers have returned once again to Crystal Lake. That’s where the money is. This horror/slasher franchise has repeatedly paid off on an inexpensive filmmaking investment. Even a previous “failed remake,” costing $20 million, earned $80 million at the box-office.

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“The Mirror” – Susan Granger reviews

Re-making Asian horror films has become a Hollywood B-movie staple, so this run-of-the-mill entry simply serves as a reminder that Kiefer Sutherland can be as intense, yelling “Damn it!” on the big screen as he is as Jack Bauer on TV’s “24.”

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