MOVIE OF THE WEEK May 11, 2018: MOUNTAIN

motw logo 1-35The word “majestic” doesn’t do justice to the stunning visuals in Jennifer Peedom’s documentary “Mountain” — but it’s quite possible that no word is up to the task of capturing this film’s sweeping, monumental imagery. When combined with the gravitas of Willem Dafoe’s narration and the power of the Australian Chamber Orchestra’s score (composed by Richard Tognetti), the result is a movie that begs to be seen on the largest, highest-definition screen available. Continue reading…

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MOUNTAIN — Review by Susan Wloszczyna

Mountain is a thing unto itself. It isn’t so much a documentary as it is a mesmerizingly immersive tone poem. It intentionally frees the mind — aided by a mood-enhancing chamber music score and an essay-like narration provided by Willem Dafoe — from having to absorb facts and figures or names and places. Instead, the viewer is given license to simply be in the moment while enjoying an up-close and personal perch to safely contemplate mankind’s need to conquer these soaring monoliths. Continue reading…

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MOUNTAIN – Review by MaryAnn Johanson

mountain posterDocumentarian Jennifer Peedom follows up her marvelous 2015 film Sherpa with another, and very different, perspective on the most soaring elements of our planet’s geography. Mountain is a meditative contemplation on the allure and the mystery, the provocation and the danger of the world’s highest peaks, as places but also as ideas. The perceptive and poetic narration, written by Peedom and Robert Macfarlane and voiced by Willem Dafoe, is full of beauty — the “siren song of the summit”; “the mountains we climb are the mountains of the mind” — and snark: show-offy extreme athletes who helicopter up mountains and snowboard avalanches down, for the Instagram likes and the lulz, highlight how we are “half in love with ourselves and half in love with oblivion.” Continue reading…

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MOUNTAIN — Review by Cate Marquis

Mountain starts in a different way from most films about mountains and their majesty. Instead of opening with mountains, we see black and white images of an orchestra tuning up and actor Willem Dafoe preparing to deliver his narration as the opening credits roll. Then there is a brief quote, “Those who dance are considered mad by those who cannot hear the music,” and the mountains make their entrance. Perhaps that opening quote describes those who risk all just to climb the planet’s highest peaks. Continue reading…

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