THE PARTY — Review by Cynthia Fuchs

THE PARTY POSTER 1“I think it’s going to unfold like the Tea Party, only bigger. It’s not #MeToo. It’s not just sexual harassment. It’s an anti-patriarchy movement. Time’s up on 10,000 years of recorded history. This is coming. This is real.” –Steve Bannon in Michael Lewis, “Has Anyone Seen the President“?

“In the film industry, we are also connected to the rhetoric in the political world — Trump and so on. Things that were unthinkable to say 10 years ago are being said again.” –Sally Potter in Orlando Parfitt, “Berlin Q&A: Sally Potter, ‘The Party‘” Continue reading…

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK February 16, 2018: THE PARTY

motw logo 1-35Sally Potter’s “The Party” is an atmospheric, rapid-fire dark comedy about a celebratory dinner party where unexpected revelations come as quickly as bon mots. With its sophisticated script and minimalist setting (the whole thing takes place nearly in real time, in just a couple of rooms), “The Party” has the feel of a play adapted for the big screen. The fact that the all-star cast includes powerhouse actresses Kristin Scott Thomas, Patricia Clarkson, Cherry Jones, and Emily Mortimer — all of whom can dominate a stage with the best of them — underlines that impression. Continue reading…

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THE PARTY — Review by Susan Wloszczyna

And now for something completely different: The Party, a tidily caustic 71-minute politically-charged dark comedy. It conveys both the tense horror of attending most American familial holiday gatherings these days and the vicious bite of Mike Nichol’s version of Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, down to a book-stacked middle-class abode and the classic black and white cinematography. A fox that creeps by open patio doors functions as a predictor — much like its cousin in Antichrist – that chaos will soon reign. Continue reading…

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THE PARTY — Review by Anne Brodie

Sally Potter’s scathing social satire The Party, shot in black and white in three claustrophobic rooms is a gem, and thankfully short given the compression of nerves and tears and emotion. What may be the most unpleasant dinner party of all time brings together a perfectly presentable group of middle class English friends – a politician, artists, a banker, a professor, a realist and a healer. Continue reading…

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THE PARTY — Review by Moira Sullivan

THE PARTY POSTERSally Potter’s eighth feature The Party occupies a sitting room, kitchen, garden and bathroom populated by veteran actors Kristin Scott Thomas, Cherry Jones Cillian Murphy, Emily Mortimer, Timothy Spall and Patricia Clarkson. The skill of the dialogue in this sitting room drama written by the UK independent filmmaker moves the film forward but equally important are ten carefully selected songs that punctuate the gathering. These have significance for each of the scenes and are inseparable from the images. With the exception of a British anthem, the selections are recorded by international artists – arias, ballads, jazz and rhythm and blues, ska, and tango. Continue reading…

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LEARNING TO DRIVE – Review by Susan Granger

learning to drive posterIf you enjoy richly observed, cross-cultural character studies, this dramedy should appeal to you. When she’s is abruptly dumped by her longtime husband (Jake Weber) for a younger woman, starchy Manhattan literary critic Wendy Shields (Patricia Clarkson) is bereft. After 21 years of marriage, she is forced to sell their book-filled Upper West Side brownstone and begin life anew in a small apartment. Read on…

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LEANING TO DRIVE, GRANDMA, AFTER WORDS and Other August 17 Openers – Reviews by Jennifer Merin

learning to drive posterThree must sees open this week. Learning to Drive is a metaphor for learning to live in filmmaker Isabel Coixet’s absolutely delightful and smart take on how a modern woman (Patricia Clarkson) survives her mid-life crisis. Grandma puts Lily Tomlin, a feisty matriarch, in the driver’s seat on a laugh-laden road trip that leads to mother-daughter reconciliations. After Words stars Marcia Gay Harden as a lonely librarian whose life shatters when she loses her job — but escapes to Costa Rica. Plus Slow Learners, Hitman: Agent 47, The Curse of Downers Grove, In the Pines and House on Rodeo Gulch. Read the reviews..

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AWFJ Movie of the Week, Aug 17 – Aug 23: LEARNING TO DRIVE

learning to drive posterOpening August 21, the AWFJ Movie of the Week is Learning to Drive, the new film from veteran Spanish director Isabel Coixet. Based on the New Yorker essay by Katha Pollitt, it stars Patricia Clarkson as a New York writer who works to get her first driver’s license after her marriage breaks down. Read on…

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AWFJ Women On Film – “Cairo Time” – Review by Cynthia Fuchs

In Cairo Time, Juliette means to care, but she seems rather unfit for it. Read more>>

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AWFJ Women On Film – The Week In Women, December 5, 2009 – MaryAnn Johanson

Another female film critic departs, some positive voices for a wider and wiser presence for women in the cinematic realm and girls kissing girls for male pleasure is still OMG hot.

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AWFJ Women On Film – Releasing September 21, 23 and 25, 2009

AWFJ highlights films made by and about women:

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