DISOBEDIENCE — Review by Susan Granger

Chilean director Sebastian Lelio, who won this year’s Foreign Language Oscar for the transgender drama A Fantastic Woman, has adapted Naomi Alderman’s novel as his first English-language film, co-writing with playwright Rebecca Lenkiewicz (Ida). Set in Hendon, the north London suburb where the Alderman, a former Orthodox Jew, grew up, it begins as elderly, revered Rav Krushka (Anton Lesser) is giving what will be his last sermon – on the nature of free will, a divine gift bestowed only on humans. Continue reading…

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DISOBEDIENCE — Review by Martha K. Baker

Disobedience deals with a vow to obey. Sebastián Lelio has made a name for himself as a director not just of films about women but of films about women on the edge. In Gloria, Lelio looked at a woman d’un certain age, flirting with a younger man; in A Fantastic Woman, he looked at a woman, who was once a man. In Disobedience, he looks at two women, former lovers. They meet again when Ronit Krushka returns to her orthodox Jewish community for the funeral of her much revered father, a rabbi of rectitude. He acted as bailiff of his bailiwick when he kicked her out, and he continued to ostracize her after his death by not mentioning her in his obituary and in not leaving her his home in his will. Continue reading…

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TIFF 2017: Of Evil Mothers, Courageous Women and Oscars Buzz!– Julide Tanriverdi reports

tiff logoActresses showed impressive range in a variety of roles at this year’s TIFF. Sure, people were talking about the incredible performance of Gary Oldman in The Darkest Hour as Winston Churchill during during the festival. After all that’s what one does during a 10 day long festival – talk movies and performances. We can all agree more or less that we can mark a big X in the yet to be released Oscar nominations for Best Actor Oldman. But more often than not, the true rage at TIFF 17 was about great Oscar buzz-generating performances by women in a wide variety of movies. Continue reading…

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MY COUSIN RACHEL — Review by Susan Granger

Daphne du Maurier’s 1951 novel is the epitome of Gothic melodrama, filled with an insidious sense of danger and death. Orphaned at an early age, Philip Ashley (Sam Claflin) was raised by his bachelor uncle Ambrose on a picturesque country estate on England’s Cornish coast. Content with his horses and dogs, Ambrose “never had much need for women.” Yet on a trip to Florence, Italy, elderly Ambrose met and married his distant cousin Rachel (Rachel Weisz). Soon after, he fell ill and died. Continue reading…

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AWFJ Movie of the Week, August 29 – September 2: The Light Between Oceans

 

light_between_oceans_posterAs we wave goodbye to a truly wretched slate of summer blockbusters, the season of serious films kicks off with a new cargo of epic stories, sweeping vistas and major actors. One film has every single one of these things – Derek Cianfrance’s adaptation of M.L. Stedman’s debut novel The Light Between Oceans. The film will have its premiere at the Venice Film Festival, before its release on September 2 in the US. Read On…

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Top Female Performances @ New York Film Festival 2015 – Liz Whittemore comments

nyff 53 logo realWith the abundance of beautiful films that screened at this year’s festival, I wanted to call to attention to a few key women who stood out from the crowd. Some were obvious to spot and already buzz-worthy. Others flew under the radar but deserve just as much applause. Altogether they add up to a significant showing for strong and complex women characters on the big screen. Welcome to the top performances by women of the New York Film Festival 2015. Read more on THE FEMALE GAZE…

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