THE WEEK IN WOMEN: USC Studies Show Numbers Still Dismal for Women in Film –Brandy McDonnell reports

Two studies released in the past week out of the University of Southern California confirm that films remain predominantly white and male both in front of and behind the cameras – meaning that basically everyone else — from women and people of color to LGBT individuals and people with disabilities — remain woefully underrepresented. Read the shocking stats and more on THE WEEK IN WOMEN.

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EBERTFEST 2016: WOMEN IN FILM PANEL — Chaz Ebert Moderated

ebertbest 2016 women's panel“How can you make an Oscar worthy film with one tenth of the budget? It’s an uneven playing field to begin with,” Darrien Gipson said in addressing the amazing disparity between the stats regarding the numbers of women compared to men from the very start of the hierarchical ladder to achievement in noviemaking. Gipson was a member of EBERTFEST’s Women in Film panel. Read more on THE FEMALE GAZE FORUM

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THE WEEK IN WOMEN: Are 2015′s Gender Gains Sustainable? Plus Blanchett, Streisand and Hollywood’s Most Powerful Women — Brandy McDonnell Reports

DAISY RIDLEY STAR WARSAs 2015 comes to a close, the question becomes are women’s box office successes just milestones in a particularly good feminist year? Or are they markers on the road to true change? The truth is, movies about and directed by women were not the rarity they’ve become since the early days of Hollywood. The entertainment industry has had its moments, particularly in the 1980s, when it vowed to open opportunities for women and seemed to do so for a while before slipping back into its comfort zone of unconscious bias and systemic sexism. What’s on the horizon? Plus Cate Blanchett signs on for Thor, Barbra Streisand is honored, Women in Film names grant recipients and this year’s list of the most powerful women in Hollywood. Read about it all in THE WEEK IN WOMEN.

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Olivia Cooke Talks DYING GIRL, Women’s Roles and Amy Winehouse (Exclusive Audio) – Jennifer Merin Interviews

meandearl3In Me And Earl and the Dying Girl, Olivia Cooke brings a vitality to the role of Rachel, the titular ‘Dying Girl,’ that is sure to touch youngsters who are coming of age — whether they’re in the grips of normal hormonal changes or life-threatening diseases. In this interview she speaks about women’s roles in cinema and the importance of not playing the victim or becoming reedits of roles written for men. Read on… and listen to the unedited audio.

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SPOTLIGHT June 2015: GEENA DAVIS, Actress, Activist, Festival Co-Founder

awfjspotlightsmallsmallIt’s never a bad time to take a moment or two to appreciate Geena Davis.

Afterall, Geena Davis is Thelma! She’s the player who taught a generation of impressionable young minds that there’s no crying in baseball! geena And, it was she who also suggested that learning how to throw your voice is a greatly entertaining way to fool your friends and have great fun at parties.

But focusing AWFJ’s Spotlight on Davis at this time is a particularly fitting tribute to the Oscar-winning actress, coming as it does on the heels of the first annual Bentonville Film Festival. What does that have to do with Davis? Read on…

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Martha Lauzen’s Latest Stats Study: No Progress on On-Screen Gender Equality! – Jennifer Merin reports

Dr. Martha Lauzen, who heads San Diego State University’s Center for the Study of Women in Film and Television, has just released her latest study about on-screen representations of female characters in the top 100 grossing films of 2014. Dr. Lauzen has been tracking the disparity in roles for women for decades. Year after year, her exacting studies show that there is little change in the stats. Gain a few points one year, lose a few the next. Progress is flat, and that’s always the disappointing non-news. Read on…

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@ TIFF 2014: Tribute to Ten Canadian Women in Film

Ten Canadian women directors and actors who have had an outstanding year are being honored at TIFF 2014 on September 18 with the Birks Diamond Tribute, presented by Telefilm Canada and Birks (a Canadian jeweler). The honorees have been selected by a pan-Canadian jury of journalists specializing in the arts, culture and entertainment. Who are they and what have they accomplished? Read on…

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Anne Thompson’s THE $11 BILLION YEAR (Exclusive Excerpt)

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After reporting on everything movies for 25 years, Hollywood pundit Anne Thompson, an AWFJ member, has written her first book. It’s fascinating. We excerpt it here.

From CHAPTER 7: WOMEN, POLITICS, AND ZERO DARK THIRTY

In its history, the Academy’s largely male directors’ branch had nominated only three other women directors—Italian Lina Wertmüller (Seven Beauties), New Zealander Jane Campion (The Piano), and American Sofia Coppola (Lost in Translation), daughter of Oscar-winningGodfather creator Francis Ford Coppola.

Gender politics in Hollywood—as everywhere else—are complex, layered, often unconscious, and difficult to parse. One can argue that things are slowly improving for women in the film industry, but they are still woefully underrepresented in too many areas, from hiring, especially as directors, to roles onscreen.

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Why Are Women In Film Stuck? — Commentary by Martha M. Lauzen — Exclusive to AWFJ

Martha Lauzen

Martha Lauzen

Women working in the film industry are stuck.

According to the latest Celluloid Ceiling study, women comprised only 16% of all directors, producers, writers, cinematographers, and editors working on the top 250 domestic grossing films of 2013. This figure is actually one percentage point lower than in 1998! Read on…

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AWFJ Women On Film – Women At Tribeca Film Festival – Katey Rich reports

For movies by, about, or for women, filmgoers at the 2009 Tribeca Film Festival had no scarcity of options.

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Women On Film Welcomes “The Week In Women” – MaryAnn Johanson’s New Weekly Column

AWFJ proudly announces “The Week In Women,” MaryAnn Johanson’s new weekly feature in Women On Film

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2008 EDA Awards Winners!

With sincerest appreciation of all the great work that�s been done in film this year, the Alliance of Women Film Journalists is pleased to announce the winners of the 2007 EDA Awards.

For a full list of 2007 EDA Award nominees, click here.

Congratulations to all!

And the winners are:

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“The End Of America ” – Jennifer Merin reviews

The End Of America presents a ten step blueprint that Hitler (and other dictators) used to subvert due process and curtail personal freedoms, and compares, step by step, events preceding establishment of the Third Reich with what’s occured in the United States during the past eight years. Convincing. Scary. Should be required viewing for those old enough to vote or join the army.

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“Who Does She Think She Is?” Hits Oklahoma City – Brandy McDonnell reviews

From Amelia Earhart to Emily Dickinson to Georgia O’Keeffe, many of the greatest women achievers in U.S. history have something in common: They had no children.

The new documentary “Who Does She Think She Is?” follows five women artists as they strive to balance their family lives, including children, with creative endeavors and economic realities.Read more>>

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Releasing December 3 and 5, 2008

AWFJ highlights films made by and about women

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“Milk” – Joanna Langfield reviews

Gus Van Sant’s stunning drama may push buttons you didn’t even know you had.

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“Milk” – Jennifer Merin comments

“Milk,” Gus Van Sant’s quasi-documentary biopic about Harvey Milk, the first openly gay man to be elected to public office in the United States, should add fuel to the flames ignited by California’s recent ban on gay marriage. Read more>>

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“Milk” – Susan Granger reviews

“Have bullhorn, will travel”could have been gay civil rights activist Harvey Milk’s mantra, instead of “I’m Harvey Milk — and I’m here to recruit you.”Whatever the rhetoric, Milk’s message was a simple one of respect, equality and hope.

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“Australia” – Joanna Langfield reviews

Baz Luhrman’s sweeping romantic adventure is packed to the gills with something for everyone. And, like that wise old adage, this hugely ambitious epic proves, while you can please some of the people some of the time, you can’t please all of them all the time.

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“Australia” – Susan Granger reviews

In one of the most ambitious, exciting filmmaking feats of the year, Baz Luhrmann has created a compelling, romantic frontier adventure that is, in its weight and grand ambition, on the epic scale of “Gone With the Wind.”

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“Australia” – Brandy McDonnell reviews

Director/producer/co-writer Baz Luhrmann’s long-awaited film “Australia” plays a bit like an Aussie version of “Gone With the Wind”: lushly beautiful, melodramatically epic and nearly as long as the Civil War. Read more>>

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“Australia” – Lexi Feinberg reviews

Bigger isn’t better when it comes to Baz Luhrman’s large-scale, over-budget failure Australia. Read more>>

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“Four Christmases” – Susan Granger reviews

While I rarely issue parental warnings, there’s a scene in this PG-13 holiday-themed romantic comedy in which the verisimilitude of Santa Claus is not only questioned but denied. I’d hate to think parents would inadvertently bring youngsters, only to have them disillusioned in such a crass, tactless way.

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Releasing November 26, 2008

AWFJ highlights films made by and about women:

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“Twilight” Author Stephenie Meyers – Brandy McDonnell Interviews

Stephenie Meyer’s path to becoming the worldwide best-selling writer of the “Twilight” series started with a dream. Read more>>

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