LITTLE PINK HOUSE — Review by Cate Marquis

A pink house is not for everyone but it was just right for Susette Kelo, especially with a lovely river view. When a local economic redevelopment organization tries to seize the Connecticut cottage she so lovingly rehabbed for a project to lure a Big Pharma company to the financially-strapped town, she fights – all the way to the Supreme Court. Continue reading…

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CHAPPAQUIDDICK — Review by Erica Abeel

A riveting recreation of the famous accident that quashed Ted Kennedy’s presidential bid and the cover-up by his political fixers, anchored by Jason Clarke’s perfectly pitched portrayal of a flawed man. Continue reading…

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK April 13, 2018: THE RIDER

motw logo 1-35Sweeping vistas and earnest, ultra-realistic performances are at the heart of Chloe Zhao’s moving drama “The Rider,” which follows the struggles of a modern cowboy after his promising rodeo career is cut short by a grave injury. The drama was filmed almost entirely on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota and features Pine Ridge residents — members of the Lakota tribe — playing thinly fictionalized versions of themselves. Continue reading…

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THE WEEK IN WOMEN: HIDDEN FIGURES TV Series, Wood in July Heister, Rodriguez Plays Sandiego — Brandy McDonnell reports

Netflix has acquired the live-action feature film rights to Carmen Sandiego, attaching Golden Globe winner Gina Rodriguez (the CW series Jane the Virgin to star as the title character. Rodriguez has also been cast alongside Evan Rachel Wood (HBO’s Westworld) to star in indie filmmaker Miranda July’s latest project, a heist film from Megan Ellison’s Annapurna Pictures and Brad Pitt’s Plan B Entertainment, with production beginning in May. Nat Geo is developing a series inspired by Hidden Figures, the 2016 Oscar-nominated film about the black women mathematicians who were unsung heroes in launching the early-day of the American space program. Continue reading on THE WEEK IN WOMEN.

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ISLE OF DOGS — Review by Susan Granger

isle of dogs posterFrom the fertile imagination of filmmaker Wes Anderson comes this unique, stop-motion animated tale of a youngster looking for his lost companion, featuring the distinctive voices of Anderson’s regular repertory company. Set in the Japanese Archipelago in the near future, this dystopian fable, narrated by Courtney B. Vance, revolves around Atari Kobayashi (Koyu Rankin), whose bodyguard dog, Spots (Liev Schreiber), is banished when Megasaki City’s cat-loving, dog-despising Mayor Kobayashi (Kunichi Nomura) decrees that, following an outbreak of a type of flu known as Snout Fever, all canines must be exiled to an island previously used for trash disposal. Continue reading…

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BEIRUT — Review by Diane Carson

Beirut paints a retrograde picture of Lebanon and US involvement. As the story set in and simply called Beirut begins in 1972, cultural attaché Mason Skiles hosts a lavish formal reception and dinner at the U.S. embassy. Mason clearly enjoys sharing the event with his wife, thirteen-year-old Palestinian ward Karim, and colleagues. Suddenly and catastrophically Mason’s world will be destroyed, and a politically retrograde plot set in motion. Continue reading…

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SCREAMERS — Review by Liz Whittemore

#screamers posterWith the news of Cambridge Analytica mining Facebook users’ personal info to further… (well,  you know), the release of the new film #Screamers couldn’t be more timely.  Everything we do is tracked these days, so you cant hide from advertisers or anyone else looking to take advantage of you. What happens when the tables are turned is something altogether different. In a game of cat and mouse, #Screamers plays well on the viral video trends, specifically one that popped up years ago where a viewer would watch a seemingly innocuous video and then BOOM, a horrific face was screaming loudly back at the unsuspecting viewer. #Screamers is done in documentary format but in truth, it is a found footage film, but you have to look hard to find that out from the beginning. Continue reading on I SCREAM YOU SCREAM.

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FINDING YOUR FEET – Review by MaryAnn Johanson

findingyourfeetWhen snooty, stick-up-her-butt Sandra discovers that her husband is cheating on her just as they were about to retire, she escapes from her English countryside manor to London, to the cosy, cramped public-housing flat of the freespirited sister, Bif, she hasn’t seen in decades. Sandra seems pretty awful at first, just plain horrible and rude even as she busts her way into Bif’s life uninvited, and precisely as we’re about to grumble, “Who the hell do you think you are?” Bif does so herself. Hooray! That sets the stage for the tart, sharp, but ultimately life-affirming dramedy to come, one that is slightly more edgy and far less predictable than it probably has any right to be. Continue reading…

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YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE — Review by Nikki Baughan

lynne ramsay you were never posterTo say that Lynne Ramsay has a powerful understanding of film may be an obvious statement, given that she’s made several critically acclaimed, award-winning features and shorts. Yet her approach to filmmaking goes beyond a mastery of the craft to an innate appreciation of cinema’s immersive power. She is skilled at bending the rules, at ensuring that every on-screen element, whether seen or heard, is authentic to her characters, and at compelling her audience to become an active participant in the story. Nowhere is that clearer than in her new film, You Were Never Really Here. Continue reading…

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A QUIET PLACE — Review by Sarah Knight Adamson

Shh…Don’t Say a Word. Sci-fi giant spider-like creatures can’t see you—so no need to hide—except, if they hear you—they’ll kill you instantly. That’s the premise of this tightly edited, spine-tingling sci-fi horror film. Be prepared for 95 minutes of suspense building, nerve-wracking drama as a family attempts to survive in a dystopian world where making a sound means certain death. Continue reading….

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