Cannes Film Festival 2018: The Fight for Inclusion Continues — Moira Sullivan reports

cannes festival 2018 logoOfficially, this was the year for women at Cannes. It is a year that is only meaningful if the number of films made by women selected to the festival increases. The realization that Cannes is a hunting ground for sexual predators can never be erased thanks to Asia Argento’s face to face in the closing ceremony. Festival de Cannes may not continue under the same exclusive terms of the past, but this is the year where acknowledging the achievements of women was dynamically profiled. Inclusion is yet to come. Continue reading…

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Créteil Films de Femmes 2018: The 40th Anniversary — Moira Sullivan reports

creiteul festival logoThe “Créteil Films de Femmes” International Women’s Film Festival is an ongoing showcase of films made by women since 1978. This year the 40th anniversary event was held from March 9-18. Through the years guests such as Agnès Varda, Delphine Seyrig, Maria Schneider, Rachel Perkins, Bernadette LaFont, Chantal Akerman, Irene Papas, and Jeanne Moreau have met the public, showed their films and discussed their work. Although attendance has shrunk considerably since its inception, it is an important cultural event sponsored by the French government and municipality of Créteil. There is no struggle for inclusion as in Cannes: women’s films are selected to be honored 100%. Credit is due to Jackie Buet and her “equipe” (team), a phenomenal artistic director whose dynamic testimony is read up on opening night and summarized at the closure of the festival. Buet is an astute cultural critic and outstanding feminist whose work through 40 years of festivals is exceptional. The Créteil Festival celebrates inclusion whereas Cannes Film Festival is known for institutional exclusion. Continue reading…

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THE SEAGULL — Review by Diane Carson

The Seagull masterfully present Chekhov’s character study. Nineteenth-century Russian playwright Anton Chekhov wrote psychologically insightful, emotionally powerful plays, among them The Cherry Orchard, Three Sisters, Uncle Vanya and The Seagull. Good actors love sinking their teeth into the vortex of intertwined, colliding lives with irreconcilable priorities and/or personalities. All of this is on display in director Michael Mayer’s new cinematic adaptation of The Seagull. Continue reading…

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POPE FRANCIS: A MAN OF HIS WORD — Review by Martha K. Baker

In 2013, Jorge Mario Bergoglio was elected Pope of the Roman Catholic Church. He was the first pope to take the name of Francis. He was also the first pope from the Americas, South America to be exact. He faces the camera in a biodoc dedicated to his life. Continue reading…

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ADRIFT — Review by Sarah Knight Adamson

adrift posterShailene Woodley’s breakout role as the spunky oldest daughter of George Clooney in The Descendants (2011) has proven her acting abilities aren’t a one-off—in fact she’s been sailing along quite nicely in Hollywood, with blockbuster films under her belt such as The Fault of Our Stars (2014) and the award-winning TV series Big Little Lies. In the ultra physically challenging role of Adrift her performance now clearly ranks her among her fellow A-list actors. Here she plays Tami Oldham in the harrowing true story of she and her fiancé, Richard Sharp’s (Sam Claflin) journey from Tahiti to San Diego aboard a 44-ft yacht, their dilemma—Hurricane Raymond, which garnered 40-ft. waves and 140 knot winds with only a few weeks into their voyage. The trailers tell us Richard is severely injured with a broken leg and ribs—(I’m not giving out any spoilers here), thus promoting Tami from skipper to captain for their survival—and, to carry the bulk of the film. Continue reading…

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ADRIFT — Review by Susan Granger

Islandic-born filmmaker Baltasar Kornmakur (Everest) cleverly manipulates chronology to twist and turn this true ‘shipwreck’ story into a tension-filled romantic drama. It begins in 1983 in Tahiti, where a 23-year old, free-spirited Californian, Tami Oldham (Shailene Woodley), meets Richard Sharp (Sam Clafin), a suave, 33 year-old Brit with a sturdy sailboat that he’s made himself. As footloose adventurers, they’re immediately attracted to one another. Continue reading…

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NANCY — Review by Cate Marquis

nancy posterAndrea Riseborough plays a young woman who lives a life barely connected to reality in director Christina Choe’s Nancy. Nancy is is a lonely person, more connected to her cell phone and her online life than her life of caring for her sickly, complaining mother Betty (Ann Dowd) in the run-down home they share. Mom criticizes and complains to her daughter about being neglected but Nancy can barely break away from the fantasy life she prefers to the grim real one with her mother. Continue reading…

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ZOO — Review by Susan Granger

If you’re searching for a feel-good, family film, I recommend Colin McIvor’s “Zoo,” a crowd favorite on the festival circuit. Based on a true story, it’s about how rebellious 12 year-old Tom Hall (Art Parkinson) and his friends save Buster, a baby elephant, during 1941 air raids on Northern Ireland. Continue reading…

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK June 1, 2018: SOCIAL ANIMALS

motw logo 1-35There’s no question about it — adulting is hard. But sometimes, as the characters in writer/director Theresa Bennett’s debut comedy Social Animals learn, you have to step up and be the grown-up in the room. Especially if that also means you get to be a bit happier and more fulfilled than you were before. Social Animals follows a group of quirky, young, mostly female Austinites as they grapple with careers (or lack thereof), relationships (ditto), and friendship. Continue reading…

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Australian Update: Rachel Ward to Direct PALM BEACH — Alexandra Heller-Nicholas Reports

Australian Film Day Reception - Palm Springs Film Fest 2010Although working steadily in a directorial capacity on Australian television for over a decade, Australian cinema icon Rachel Ward – renowned as much for her acting as her filmmaking – is making her much-anticipated return to the director’s chair in the newly announced feature Palm Beach. Following up from her celebrated 2009 feature Beautiful Kate, Palm Beach is co-written by Ward and the accomplished Australian playwright and novelist Joanna Murray-Smith. Boasting an impressive cast including Sam Neill, Greta Scacchi, Jacqueline McKenzie, Richard E. Grant, and both Ward’s husband Bryan Brown and daughter Matilda Brown, filming is soon to begin Sydney’s beautiful Palm Beach area shooting from late May to early July. Continue reading…

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