AWFJ PRESENTS film series is streaming on KinoMarquee.com SUBSCRIBE NOW

  Female Film Critics 24/365  Recent Blog Posts

O UNILATERALIS – Review by Alexandra Heller-Nicholas

That so few films in the found footage horror genre are directed by women or genderfluid directors adds to the significance here; it’s unusual to find a found footage horror film directed by anyone but white dudes full stop, and that it takes this fascinating direction here marks it as even more unique. O Unilateralis is a solid, confident, super-low budget found footage horror film long overdue proper distribution (festivals, take note!). For fans of the subgenre it will come as a much needed breath of fresh air, director Michelle Nessk proving herself once more as a force to be reckoned with.

Read more

OPERATION MINCEMEAT – Review by Martha K Baker

Ian Fleming — yes, that Ian Fleming — narrates Operation Mincemeat: “In any story,” he writes, “there is that which is seen and that which is hidden.” Such is the case with Operation Mincemeat and the fascinating — and flawed — film based on the true event. The time is July 1943 during World War II. The place is England; the target is Sicily.

Read more

TORN HEARTS – Review by Alexandra Heller Nicholas

Part feminist county music Sunset Boulevard, part dreams-of-making-it-big-gone-wrong melodrama, Brea Grant’s direction and the performance of Katy Segal as Harper Dutch in particular give Torn Hearts an oomph that in the hands of others it may have otherwise lacked. While not reinventing the horror or thriller wheel by any stretch, Torn Hearts is solid fun, and doesn’t hold back in calling its women characters to account; this is no idealized fairytale where it’s all girl power and unity. For better or for worse, it’s dog eat dog.

Read more

MOVIE OF THE WEEK May 20, 2022 – FANNY: THE RIGHT TO ROCK

If you heard that David Bowie told Rolling Stone in 1999 that a group popular in the 1970s was “one of the finest f–ing rock bands of their time,” who would you guess he was talking about? Led Zepplin? The Who? Deep Purple? Wrong, wrong, and wrong. He was heaping praise on Fanny, the groundbreaking all-female band formed by Filipina sisters Jean and June Millington, whose story is told in Bobbi Jo Hart’s rousing documentary Fanny: The Right to Rock.

Read more

Opening , May 16 to 22, 2022 – Margaret Barton-Fumo reports

The Alliance of Women Film Journalists highlights movies made by and about women. With a vigilant eye toward current releases, we maintain an interactive record of films that are pertinent to our interests. Be they female-made or female-centric productions, they are films that represent a wide range of women’s stories and present complex female characters. As such, they are movies that will most likely be reviewed on AWFJ.org and will qualify for consideration for our annual EDA Awards, celebrating exceptional women working in film behind and in front of the camera.

Read more

FIRE IN THE MOUNTAINS – Review by Jennifer Green

It would be hard not to be affected by Fire in the Mountains‘ dire story of one woman’s personal struggles in a Himalayan village. Embodied within her story are larger themes, clear but crafted in subtle and realistic ways, about a woman’s place in her world and the simmering conflict between traditional and modern India. Set in a beautiful area touted as the Switzerland of India for its spectacular Himalayan views, the film contrasts that natural beauty with the scarcity and hardships of its villagers.

Read more

HAPPENING – Review by Lois Alter Mark

If there was ever a movie meant for this particular time in history, this is the one. The winner of the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival, Audrey Diwan’s Happening is a quietly devastating look at what happens when abortion is illegal. The fact that it’s coincidentally being released in the U.S. the same week a leaked Supreme Court draft opinion revealed that Roe v. Wade is on the verge of being overturned feels like it should be taken as a sign. And, more importantly, a wake-up call.

Read more

DECEPTION – Review by Joan Amenn

It helps, but is not mandatory, to know something about the work of author Philip Roth when viewing this adaptation of his novel, Deception. The book is mostly dialog between its two main characters so any attempt at translating it to film is a daring project. Director Arnaud Desplechin takes it on with a strong sense of the rhythmic nature of the give and take between the two lovers that make up the plot. However, the underlying themes of self-loathing and obsession bog down the story, making it feel stifling and static at times.

Read more

BANKSY MOST WANTED – Review by Diane Carson

Banksy Most Wanted meanders through its two primary topics: Banksy’s identity and the reception of his art. It circles back to Girl with Balloon without adding any new insights, and those who argue they’ve discovered the real person merit more extensive questioning, saving them from sounding cavalier. In other words, a thorough re-edit would have improved Banksy Most Wanted, in which the fragmented, inconclusive hunt for Banksy seems to have guided and imprinted this work as well.

Read more

HACKS SEASON 2 – Review by Martha K Baker

The writing in Season 2 is just as sharp as in the mother series. When Ava asks Deborah how many stalkers she actually has, Deborah fires back: “Living?” Ava and Deborah develop into characters who mesh more often than they abrade. They talk sex. One sues and one teaches the other to float. They laugh at each other’s lines. Or not. The subplots introduce strong storylines, including Ava’s burden of her father’s ashes and, at the fair, Deborah’s finding a woman she’d betrayed years before.

Read more