MARINA ANTUNES is the Editor-in-Chief of Quiet Earth and co-hosts the Before The Dawn podcast. Vancouver-based, she has written about film since 2005. She’s a member of AWFJ’s Team #MOTW.

  Female Film Critics 24/365  recent blog posts

Memphis Film Prize winners Abby Meyers and Kevin Brooks talk A NIGHT OUT and Sexual Violence – Brandy McDonnell interviews

A Night Out was primarily shot in the twisty hallways and narrow staircases of the Mollie Fontaine Lounge, an old Victorian mansion that has been converted into a trendy Memphis night spot. The short literally follows Jessica (Rosalyn Ross) as she wanders through the corridors and encounters an admiring stranger (Bertram Williams) who takes flirtation too far.

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JACOB’S LADDER – Review by Maitland McDonagh

A remake of the 1990 psychological horror film, this new Jacob’s Ladder (which debuted on DISH network before receiving a theatrical release) manages to seem longer than the original—despite being nearly 15 minutes shorter—and is ultimately both less eerily stylish and less compelling.

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AFTER THE WEDDING – Review by Sheila Roberts

Set against the backdrop of two vastly different worlds, one of abject poverty and another of extraordinary affluence, the past collides with the present in writer/director Bart Freundlich’s thought-provoking and sensitively directed film, After The Wedding.

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WEEK IN WOMEN: Bharoocha’s directorial debut: GOLDEN ARM – Brandy McDonnell reports Golden Arm

Maureen Bharoocha is making her feature film directorial debut with Golden Arm, a female buddy comedy about ladies arm wrestling. Bharoocha is best known for her work as a rising comedic director for Jimmy Kimmel Live!, as well as her films that have appeared on the Lifetime Network, including I Am Watching You and Fatal Flip.

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SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK – Review by Susan Granger

Producer Guillermo del Toto (Pan’s Labyrinth) has created a socially conscious, surprisingly grim, ‘gateway horror’ anthology that’s PG-13, geared toward younger viewers, connecting Alvin Schwartz’s tales, grotesquely illustrated by Stephen Grammell, revolving around six teenagers in 1968, just before Richard Nixon’s election.

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AFTER THE WEDDING – Review by Erica Abeel

In remakes of foreign films American directors sometimes copy the source almost to the letter. Other times they update their own version to reflect current issues. In After the Wedding Bart Freundlich and his team make the worthy effort of tweaking the original to bring women to the forefront. But much of the original’s savor is lost in translation.

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MILLENNIUM ACTRESS – Review by Diane Carson

One of the outstanding features of Japanese animé is the artists’ attention to detail. Captivating stories intertwine complex characters’ political and personal circumstances, kept at a safe distance through animation, all the while presenting poignant content. Co-writer/director Satoshi Kon’s 2002 Millennium Actress comes close to achieving the highest artistry while delivering a bittersweet, deeply moving narrative.

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