A UNITED KINGDOM — Review by Susan Granger

0 Flares 0 Flares ×

In London in 1947, the future King of Botswana, Prince Seretse Khama (David Oyelowo), who was studying law at Oxford, met a beautiful Englishwoman, Ruth Williams (Rosamund Pike), at a Mission Society dance and, soon after, they impulsively married. That’s just the beginning of this intriguing true story. Original opposition to their union came not only from Ruth’s racist father (Nicholas Lyndhurst) but also from the British government. Britain’s South Africa regime had recently introduced the policy of apartheid, so a biracial couple ruling a neighboring country seemed out of the question. Read on…

Economically, Britain needed access to resource-rich South Africa’s uranium for their nuclear program and gold-mining rights, which were vital to replenishing the depleted reserves following W.W.II. Plus there was a strategic threat of South Africa’s invading Bechuanaland (later known as Botswana).

So their scandalous union precipitated an international crisis, which was further complicated by Seretse Khama’s obstinate uncle/guardian, Tshekedi Khama (Vusi Kunene). Acting as Regent, he has repeatedly urged his people to cooperate with the traditional colonial government.

In addition, Seretse’s aunt (Abena Ayivor) and sister (Terry Pheto) believe his marriage to a white woman demeans the black women of their Bamangwato tribe.

But when dignified, defiant and ultimately persuasive Seretse Khama arrives back in his African homeland with resilient Ruth – that changes everything – along with the discovery of diamonds.

Based on Susan William’s historical book “Colour Bar,” it’s simplistically adapted by Guy Hibbert and sensitively directed by Ghana’s Amma Asante (“Belle”), who astutely utilizes her superb ensemble, headed by David Oyelowo (“Selma”) and Rosamund Pike (“Gone Girl”) – with Jack Davenport and Tom Felton as the intimidating, bureaucratic villains.

Sam McCurdy’s stunning cinematography captures the flat, sunbaked landscape of Botswana, which recently celebrated its 50th anniversary of independence, but the editing is erratic.

On the Granger Movie Gauge of 1 to 10, “A United Kingdom” is a compassionate, if shallow 6, an inspiring geopolitical biopic.

0 Flares Twitter 0 Facebook 0 0 Flares ×
Avatar

Susan Granger

Susan Granger is a product of Hollywood. Her natural father, S. Sylvan Simon, was a director and producer at R.K.O., M.G.M. and Columbia Pictures; her adoptive father, Armand Deutsch, produced movies at M.G.M. As a child, Susan appeared in movies with Abbott & Costello, Red Skelton, Lucille Ball, Margaret O'Brien and Lassie. She attended Mills College in California, studying journalism with Pierre Salinger, and graduated from the University of Pennsylvania, Phi Beta Kappa, with highest honors in journalism. During her adult life, Susan has been on radio and television as an anchorwoman and movie/drama critic. Her newspaper reviews have been syndicated around the world, and she has appeared on American Movie Classics cable television. In addition, her celebrity interviews and articles have been published in REDBOOK, PLAYBOY, FAMILY CIRCLE, COSMOPOLITAN, WORKING WOMAN and THE NEW YORK TIMES, as well as in PARIS MATCH, ELLE, HELLO, CARIBBEAN WORLD, ISLAND LIFE, MACO DESTINATIONS, NEWS LIMITED NEWSPAPERS (Australia), UK DAILY MAIL, UK SUNDAY MIRROR, DS (France), LA REPUBBLICA (Italy), BUNTE (Germany), VIP TRAVELLER (Krisworld) and many other international publications through SSG Syndicate. Susan also lectures on the "Magic and Mythology of Hollywood" and "Don't Take It Personally: Conquering Criticism and other Survival Skills," originally published on tape by Dove Audio.