FILM STARS DON’T DIE IN LIVERPOOL — Review by Susan Granger

0 Flares 0 Flares ×

Annette Bening delivers a powerhouse performance as sultry Gloria Grahame. Yet to fully appreciate it, you should know a bit about who this enigmatic actress was. Back in 1940s and ‘50s film noir, Grahame starred in “Crossfire,” “Sudden Fear,” “The Big Heat,” “In a Lonely Place” and “The Bad and the Beautiful,” for which she won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar. Fans also remember her from “It’s a Wonderful Life,” “The Greatest Show on Earth” and “Oklahoma!” Continue reading…

Obsessed with her appearance, Grahame underwent extensive plastic surgery, habitually fixing nonexistent flaws. Her volatile temperament alienated even the most admiring directors, and she courted scandalous gossip with four disastrous marriages – one to the son of an ex-husband.

The day after divorcing actor Stanley Clements, she married director Nicholas Ray. That ended disastrously after Ray found Gloria in bed with Tony, his 13 year-old son by a previous marriage. She then married and divorced producer Cy Howard before marrying her stepson, 23 year-old Tony Ray.

In 1979, Gloria was on-stage in England when she met Peter Turner (Jamie Bell), a British actor who was 28 years younger. Peter became besotted with her, and she spent the last days of her life at his family’s home in Liverpool. Gloria Grahame died from recurring breast cancer in 1981 at age 57.

This is their love story. Just theirs – with only occasional flashbacks. Too bad there weren’t more.

Inspired by Turner’s memoir, adapted by Matt Greenhalgh and directed by Paul McGuigan, it was propelled into production by James Bond producer Barbara Broccoli, who has known Turner for more than 40 years.

Not only is Annette Bening riveting but Jamie Bell gets his first meaty role since “Billy Elliot.” Their “Saturday Night Fever” disco seduction sequence is terrific. And they’re given stalwart support from Julie Walters and Vanessa Redgrave.

If you’re curious to know more about the real Gloria Grahame, I highly recommend Vincent Curcio’s 1989 biography “Suicide Blonde.”

On the Granger Movie Gauge of 1 to 10, “Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool” is a subtly poignant 7, another Tinseltown tragedy.

0 Flares Twitter 0 Facebook 0 0 Flares ×
Avatar

Susan Granger

Susan Granger is a product of Hollywood. Her natural father, S. Sylvan Simon, was a director and producer at R.K.O., M.G.M. and Columbia Pictures; her adoptive father, Armand Deutsch, produced movies at M.G.M. As a child, Susan appeared in movies with Abbott & Costello, Red Skelton, Lucille Ball, Margaret O'Brien and Lassie. She attended Mills College in California, studying journalism with Pierre Salinger, and graduated from the University of Pennsylvania, Phi Beta Kappa, with highest honors in journalism. During her adult life, Susan has been on radio and television as an anchorwoman and movie/drama critic. Her newspaper reviews have been syndicated around the world, and she has appeared on American Movie Classics cable television. In addition, her celebrity interviews and articles have been published in REDBOOK, PLAYBOY, FAMILY CIRCLE, COSMOPOLITAN, WORKING WOMAN and THE NEW YORK TIMES, as well as in PARIS MATCH, ELLE, HELLO, CARIBBEAN WORLD, ISLAND LIFE, MACO DESTINATIONS, NEWS LIMITED NEWSPAPERS (Australia), UK DAILY MAIL, UK SUNDAY MIRROR, DS (France), LA REPUBBLICA (Italy), BUNTE (Germany), VIP TRAVELLER (Krisworld) and many other international publications through SSG Syndicate. Susan also lectures on the "Magic and Mythology of Hollywood" and "Don't Take It Personally: Conquering Criticism and other Survival Skills," originally published on tape by Dove Audio.