Horror Movies and Kids: A Scary Combination — Betsy Bozdech, Brandy McDonnell, Jennifer Merin, Nell Minow and Liz Whittemore comment

Research shows that, on average, kids see horror movies as young as 7 years old. And we’ve all noticed members of the PG crowd at decidedly R-rated movies — in fact, when my daughter was in the second grade, she had multiple classmates who’d seen “It.” It’s not realistic to expect that we can shield kids from scary or gory content forever. And, in fact, it can be counterproductive to prevent children from seeing any kind of conflict, loss, or trauma on screen. Far better to use these moments, when they come, as opportunities to help them through hard stuff in a safe place.

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CINDERELLA – Review by Katie M. (Guest Post)

Because Cinderella is likely to be seen by legions of youngsters around the globe, we wondered how kiddos would interpret this latest screen adaptation of the classic fairy tale. We asked Betsy Bozdech McNab’s daughter, Katie, a savvy tweenager who knows a lot of fairy tales and sees a lot of movies, to review Kay Cannon’s musical live action production. Here’s Katie’s take on the show:

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One Thing Movie Studios Can Do to Support Diversity in Media Criticism – Betsy Bozdech comments

If studios and filmmakers truly believe in fostering diversity — behind the scenes, on camera, and in the dark rooms where writers who care passionately about film and media engage with their work — then it’s time to help make access to those films as equitable as possible. And that means continuing to make screeners available regularly so that reviewers everywhere, from every demographic, have the chance to make their perspectives heard. Equitable access to media screeners will give more voice to reviewers everywhere.

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Linda Goldstein Knowlton on WE ARE RADICAL MONARCHS – Betsy Bozdech interviews

Emmy-nominated filmmaker Linda Goldstein Knowlton’s latest film, We Are the Radical Monarchs, is a documentary that tells the uplifting, fist-pumping story of a new kind of scouting troop for young girls. After a successful tour of film festivals, We Are the Radical Monarchs will reach a wider audience on PBS. The film underlines the importance of inclusion, representation, and activism in today’s world.

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Amy Goldstein and Anouchka van Riel on KATE NASH: UNDERESTIMATE THE GIRL- Betsy Bozdech interviews

Since graduating from NYU film school, Amy Goldstein has spent her career behind the camera directing everything from music videos to critically acclaimed shorts and award-winning features. Her most recent project is a documentary that tracks the roller coaster career of British rocker Kate Nash, who first shot to fame in the MySpace era and now co-stars on Netflix’s hit series GLOW.

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Bentonville Film Fest and Coca-Cola Fund Female Filmmakers – Betsy Bozdech reports

Bentonville Film Festival and the Coca-Cola Foundation are partnering to support female filmmakers with the brand-new “See It, Be It Filmmaker Fellowship.” The program is specifically intended to support filmmakers from historically underrepresented communities and is fully aligned with the BFF’s “Include” approach to diversifying film from the ground up.

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Horror Movies and Kids: A Scary Combination — Betsy Bozdech, Brandy McDonnell, Jennifer Merin, Nell Minow and Liz Whittemore comment

Research shows that, on average, kids see horror movies as young as 7 years old. And we’ve all noticed members of the PG crowd at decidedly R-rated movies — in fact, when my daughter was in the second grade, she had multiple classmates who’d seen “It.” And that’s a problem. While research indicates that media violence doesn’t directly make kids who are exposed to it more aggressive, some studies do suggest that, combined with other risk factors — including things like substance abuse and conflict at home — media violence can contribute to violent behavior.

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Bentonville FF: Karen Day on BAMBOO AND BARBED WIRE -Betsy Bozdech interviews

Karen Day has done everything from war-zone reporting in Afghanistan, Iraq, Rwanda, and more to co-authoring a book (Seal: The Unspoken Sacrifice) to raising four children. She turned her attention to feature filmmaking with 2014’s Girl from God’s Country — a documentary about pioneering female filmmaker Nell Shipman. Now, with Bamboo and Barbed Wire, she explores the parallels between Japanese American internment during World War II and our current political climate and attitude toward refugees

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Bentonville FF – Ani Simon-Kennedy and Kishori Rajan on THE SHORT HISTORY OF THE LONG ROAD – Betsy Bozdech interviews

Director Ani Simon-Kennedy — a veteran of commercial shoots and socially conscious projects — screened her second narrative feature, The Short History of the Long Road, at this year’s Bentonville Film Festival after premiering it at the 2019 Tribeca Film Festival. She has received support from the Sundance Institute, The Tribeca Film Institute, IFP, Film Independent, Chanel and AT&T. Accompanied by producer Kishori Rajan, Simon-Kennedy — who’s based in New York, where she and her producing partner Caitlin Yatsko run Bicephaly Pictures — talked to AWFJ about her film, a road movie starring Sabrina Carpenter and Danny Trejo, and female filmmakers.

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Bentonville FF: Amy Goldstein and Anouchka van Riel on KATE NASH: UNDERESTIMATE THE GIRL- Betsy Bozdech interviews

Since graduating from NYU film school, Amy Goldstein has directed everything from music videos to critically acclaimed shorts , award-winning features, a hip-hop musical and more. After making 2014’s The Hooping Life, she began documenting the life of British rocker Kate Nash, who shot to fame in the MySpace era and now co-stars on Netflix’s GLOW. Joined by producer Anouchka van Riel, Goldstein sat down to talk about the frank, endearing, music-filled documentary, Kate Nash: Underestimate the Girl Read more