Cannes Film Festival 2024: Yes, Women Cannes – Nikki Fowler reports

This year, the Cannes Film Festival spotlighted a rich diversity within its Official Selection Jury, including prominent women like Oscar nominee Lily Gladstone (Killers of the Flower Moon) and the Jury President, Oscar-winning director Greta Gerwig (Barbie). The festival celebrated the achievements of many female filmmakers and actresses, who not only appeared on screens in the South of France but also took home prestigious awards. The festival was a powerful celebration of women’s contributions to cinema, setting a high standard for future events.

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WE GROWN NOW – Review by Nikki Fowler

The most striking element of We Grown Now outside of the outstanding actors including the young Blake Cameron James (Malik) and Gian Knight Ramirez (Eric) starring as two young friends growing up in the Cabrini Green public housing projects in 1990’s Chicago, is the extreme care and poetic take that director and writer Minhal Baig delivers. Despite growing up in Chicago she didn’t have first hand knowledge of the Cabrini Green community but knew enough of the racist, classist and oppressive history and the fear many had of going near the government housing project riddled with violence, including the story of real life Dantrell Davis, a young child who was shot on his way to school which rocked the community in 1992.

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PASANG: IN THE SHADOW OF EVEREST – Review by Nikki Fowler

Pasang: In the Shadow of Everest is a fascinating and inspirational documentary about the power of one woman to challenge racism and sexism and achieve the status of becoming the first Nepalese woman to climb Mt. Everest. In a sea of privilege, foreigners are financially sponsored to make attempt after attempt and fail. with massive casualties to Sherpas, local climbing guides from Nepal who risk it all to help mostly foreign men make the climb year after year.

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THE TEACHER’S LOUNGE – Review by Nikki Fowler

İlker Çatak’s German thriller The Teachers’ Lounge is a raw donut into the classroom/teacher dynamic where what is usually defined as a safe space in which students are nurtured and educated, is truly at times a petri dish of real-world antics, including racism, crime, cheating, violence, stereotypes, bias and social chaos at some of the most important developmental years of one’s life and it’s not always coming from the students.

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SUBJECT – Review by Nikki Fowler

Jennifer Tiexiera and Camilla Hall shed light on a subject that could easily slip by our radar: the impact of documentaries and their ability to trend. With sensational voyeuristic fascination, the masses consume this fly on the wall world of real life through docuseries and films, But viewers are not aware that the documentary subjects are sometimes unsuspecting victims to exploitation — whether it’s whether unintentional or calculated.

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MIRANDA’S VICTIM – Review by Nikki Fowler

Miranda’s Victim is a riveting drama about the real-life rape victim Trish Weir, played by the wonderfully talented Abigail Breslin, who gave an inspiring performance through waves of sexism at a time in the 60’s when most women stayed silent on abuse, and most men saw rape victims as a disgrace or as fabricators.

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INVISIBLE BEAUTY – Review by Nikki Fowler

Invisible Beauty is a love letter to Black women and to the icon who is model, fashion industry veteran and activist Bethann Hardison. For anyone who knows the legacy and evolution of Black women in fashion and runway casting into the 90s. knows of the trials and tribulations that went into creating and sustaining legendary names such as Naomi Campbell, Tyson Beckford, Tyra Banks, Cynthia Bailey and Iman in a racially hostile industry, and will easily understand the importance of this documentary written and directed by Hardison herself.

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JOYCE CAROL OATES: A BODY IN SERVICE OF MIND – Review by Nikki Fowler

Greenwich Entertainment’s documentary Joyce Carol Oates: A Body in the Service of Mind is a beautiful and informative look into the life and work of the beloved and award-winning novelist by the same name, who not only wrote a series of novels drenched immensely in gender, race, socioeconomics, and politics but who wrote dramatic novels sans politics under pseudonyms which she described as getting to “start over” and “to write as if she were “writing for the first time.”

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OUR FATHER, THE DEVIL – Review by Nikki Fowler

Female critics and reviewers are essential and that isn’t more plainly seen then when unpacking the deeply riveting psychological France based thriller Our Father, the Devil. The film dives into one’s woman’s past, secrets and tragedy as a Guinean chef, Marie (played by Babetida Sadjo), who is working at a high end retirement community that has an unexpected encounter with an African Catholic priest who is delivering a sermon. Our Father, the Devil. is a laudable directing debut from Ellie Foumbi.

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