AWFJ Chooses Movies with Levity for Ho Ho Holiday Viewing

December — and especially this December — is a very good time to seek a bit of seasonal levity in the form of favorite flicks. And so we present for your enjoyment AWFJ’s wonderfully varied list of recommended movies for ho ho holiday viewing. The roster features romance, comedy, thrills and lots of food. We’ve selected films that are upbeat, inspiring and spirited, although not all are directly connected to traditional celebrations. Wonder what’s in store?

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK December 11, 2020: FAREWELL AMOR

Love — and the best of intentions — may not be enough to overcome a 17-year separation for the reunited family of three who are at the heart of writer/director Ekwa Msangi’s touching first feature, Farewell Amor. This affecting drama raises thoughtful, heartfelt questions about what it means to be a family, And, it takes an honest and insightful look at the difficulties of immigration.

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Whistler Film Festival Filmmaker Interview: Ashley Eakin on SINGLE

Single confronts the complexities of being disabled and dating. Kim, who was born with one arm, gets set-up to go on a blind date. When she finally meets Jake, to her horror – he only has one hand. Unable to get over the apparent ignorance of the matchmaker, as well as her own insecurities about being different, Kim tries to bail on the date. Ashley Eakin and Single are nominated for the AWFJ EDA Award for Best female-Directed Short at Whistler Film Festival.

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK December 4, 2020: LUXOR

Centering on a powerful performance by Andrea Riseborough, Zeina Durra’s dreamy, introspective romantic drama Luxor explores what-ifs and second chances as its characters explore ancient Egyptian ruins, finding their way to a place of connection and understanding. Riseborough plays Hana, a British doctor who’s come to the city of Luxor to rest and recuperate from the stresses of her efforts as an international aid worker.

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Whistler Film Festival Filmmaker Interview: Aimee Long on A SHOT THROUGH THE WALL

Inspired by a true event, A Shot Through The Wall is about an Asian American police officer who accidentally discharges his weapon during an investigation, killing a black teenager through an apartment wall. The case spirals out of control as the incident is deemed police racial bias.

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Whistler Film Festival Filmmaker Interview: Wendy Morgan on SUGAR DADDY

Some films jump off the screen to announce the arrival of vital new talent. Such is the case with Wendy Morgan’s Sugar Daddy, starring Kelly McCormack in a tour de force performance as Darren, a new age music composer and performer who is trying to break into the record industry. Sugar Daddy is the opening film for Whistler Film Festival 2020.

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Whistler Film Festival Filmmaker Interview: Niav Conty on SMALL TIME

Niav Conty’s Small Time is about childhood, family, and the role models around us. Stubborn patriotism, dogmatic faith, and the sexualization of young women are all themes that swirl around in this tragic story about a ten year old girl surrounded by addicted adults. Your heart goes out to her.

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Whistler Film Festival Filmmaker Interview: Ali Liebert on THE QUIETING

The Quieting tells the story of Maggie, an anxious and newly queer woman on the eve of her first date with a woman. She is thrown into the throes of self-doubt and fear is confronted by an unexpected guest. Sara Canning and Julia Sarah Stone star in this psychological thriller by Ali Liebert that snaps the struggle of identity sharply into focus.

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Whistler Film Festival Filmmaker Interview: Elinor Nechemya on OUR HEARTS BEAT LIKE WAR

With his eyes in a fantasy book and his ears to the horrific testimony of an Eritrean refugee, nine-year-old Sinai falls asleep at his mother’s workplace, and his mind drifts away. In his sleep his mother tells him a surrealistic fairytale about a Syrian refugee family living in Sweden. This “fairytale” is about a young Syrian boy who falls into a coma-like situation after the family receives a deportation letter from the government.

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Whistler Film Festival Interview: Susan Rodgers on STILL THE WATER

A former museum curator, Susan Rodgers’ film career started with a wardrobe continuity gig on the television show Emily of New Moon. Soon a box of wartime letters discovered in an attic launched her first film, the half-hour period drama Bobby’s Peace. Rodgers’ inaugural feature film, Still The Water, was completed in the spring of 2020.

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