Despite Progress, Europe’s Film Industry Struggles with Gender Equality – Jennifer Green reports

The European Audiovisual Observatory (EAO) reports that women represented fewer than one out of four film directors in Europe (23%) between 2016 and 2020. Females made up slightly more producers (33%) and screenwriters (27%), but struggled to have a significant presence in technical positions like cinematographers (10%) and composers (9%). Women directed fewer films than men and were less likely to be sole directors of feature films than their male counterparts. Female producers were involved in 44% of European feature films (alone or in teams), but on average women tended to produce slightly fewer films than men. Women also made up less than half (39%) of lead roles. The Paris-based “Femmes de cinema” Lab initiative’s 2021 study shows that “on average and even today, women are less paid, less subsidized, less programmed than men, and female characters are still too often poor or stereotypical.”

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COAST – Review by Jennifer Green

This small indie film from directors Jessica Hester and Derek Schweickart does a better job at capturing the restlessness, the risks and the thrills of being a teenager than most teen-targeted studio films ever hope, or probably aim, to. Coast‘s realism is underscored by its setting, a central California coastal town with a heavily Hispanic farming community, a place where kids grow up looking toward a life working the fields if they don’t strive for something different – or leave.

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SWAN SONG – Review by Jennifer Green

In Swan Song, Cameron Turner is dying of cancer, but rather than reveal his diagnosis to his wife, Poppy and son, Cameron opts to undergo an experimental new treatment to clone himself and let the replicant continue living his life. During the final stages of the treatment under the supervision of Dr. Scott, Cameron has to face the reality of his decision and confront whether he’s ready to say goodbye to his loved ones — and life as he knows it.

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THE HAND OF GOD – Review by Jennifer Green

Italy’s 2021 submission for the International Oscar is a beautiful coming-of-age story and a love letter to both director Paolo Sorrentino’s native Naples and the art of filmmaking. There are many memorable images in The Hand of God, mostly involving a contrast of dark interiors with the sapphire Mediterranean and the blinding sun of southern Italy. Likewise, the film’s characters and scenarios are extremely evocative.

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About Jennifer Green

Jennifer discovered a passion for international movies as an escape from her graduate studies in San Francisco, but it wasn’t until she moved to Spain that she realized she could make a career of it. After a stint in the ABC News Madrid Bureau, where — among other things — she got to meet the country’s first female bullfighter, she became Screen International’s correspondent for Spain and Portugal. She’s been writing about the film industry in Europe and Latin America for more than 20 years, most recently for The Hollywood Reporter.

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