For the Love of Gialli – Maitland McDonagh comments

There was a time when few American moviegoers knew what giallo meant, but the gialli genre helped change the landscape of American films during the 1970s, a time of tumultuous changes in American filmmaking. Gialli brought a new sensibility to American shores—not to art houses, but to local cinemas and then television, video, DVD and streaming—one that has thrilled generations of moviegoers and moviemakers. Nightmares are discomfitingly potent dreams, and gialli are candy-colored nightmares it’s oh-so hard to resist.

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FORBIDDEN PHOTOS OF A LADY ABOVE SUSPICION – Review by Maitland McDonagh

Forbidden Photos of A Lady Above Suspicion is a thriller that takes on a whole new significance in our era of, to be honest, frightening biotechnology, in addition addressing—however indirectly—still hot-button issues related to agency, consent and larger social constructs that define a woman’s right to say, “Hell no.”

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STRIP NUDE FOR YOUR KILLER – Review by Maitland McDonagh

Where to begin? Strip Nude for Your Killer is a mind boggler—how many movies that suggest they’re all about sexy hijinks open with a pretty young woman—a model, it ensues–legs spread, having a heart attack as she undergoes an illegal abortion? Yes, that’s the start of a fun time at the movies.

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THE CAT RESCUERS – Review by Maitland McDonagh

Animal rescue work is a personal avocation—The Cat Rescuers makes that clear—but it’s also a measure of how seriously a society takes its responsibility to those without power. And it’s not a great leap to immigrant children, the impoverished elderly, abused women and poor children and teenagers.

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BEFORE STONEWALL – Review by Maitland McDonagh

Newly restored to mark the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots, Greta Schiller’s Before Stonewall (1984) chronicles the making of a gay and lesbian community, through the recollections of gay men and women who paved the road to Stonewall by simply living their lives and loving the people they loved, despite draconian laws that ensured that they could be refused employment or fired from their jobs, denied the right to rent apartments and thrown in jail simply for being who they were. The film reminds us that rights fought and paid for can be taken away, a fact well worth noting in our parlous times.

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KEDI — Review by Maitland McDonagh

In much of the world, stray and feral felines are considered nuisances at best and outright pests at worst. But not in Istanbul, argues Turkish-born, US-based filmmaker Ceyda Torun, whose Kedi (odd how much the word sounds like “kitty”) documents the lives of street cats whose beat—one that spans millennia–is the city’s busting waterfront district, where shopkeepers and residents alike have settled into a symbiotic relationship with the sweet-faced little predators who help keep the rodent population down while happily accepting handouts.

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