BIG TIME ADOLESCENCE – Review by Sarah Ward

This isn’t just a movie about a kid attempting to be popular, endeavoring to woo his first girlfriend and stressing out his parents, although the template definitely fits. It’s a film about a teen who has grown up with one concept of maturity and one vision of approaching life with a casual, anything goes, “you only live once” attitude, but finds himself reassessing his choices — as well as the friend that’s shaped them.

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MAKE UP – Review by Sarah Ward

To first-time feature writer/director Claire Oakley, her debut film Make Up and the movie’s 18-year-old protagonist Ruth (Molly Windsor), the roar of the Cornish seaside is equally unnerving and alluring — a force that threatens as much as it calms, and entices while splashing its dangers anywhere and everywhere.

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THE DONUT KING (SXSW2020) – Review by Sarah Ward

Alice Gu’s documentary delves into the reverence afforded to the humble doughnut while charting how Ted Ngoy played a part in that status. And, likely to the surprise of most watching, it explores how his instant fondness helped completely change the lives of many of his fellow Cambodian Americans fleeing genocide, while also pondering the importance of a nation such as the US aiding refugees in need — and the contributions they make to society in return.

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ROMA – Review by Sarah Ward

Domestic worker Cleo (Yalitza Aparicio) attends to the everyday needs of her middle-class employers and their four loving but unruly children, treating them like family. But she’s the first to rise in their well-appointed household in Mexico City’s Colonia Roma neighbourhood, and the last to sleep. She’s the person who both tucks the kids into their beds and scrapes dog excrement from the driveway each day. Cleo is part of the fabric of their lives, but the minutiae of her life is never part of theirs.

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ROBIN HOOD – Review by Sarah Ward

The latest version of Robin Hood takes its cues from modernised medieval epics to give audiences a high-energy dose of action, although nobody will feel particularly richer or poorer for it. Returning the folkloric figure to the big screen for the first time since 2010, this is a new, younger-skewing original story rather than a rehash, with designs on setting up a new franchise.

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