JACOB’S LADDER – Review by Maitland McDonagh

A remake of the 1990 psychological horror film, this new Jacob’s Ladder (which debuted on DISH network before receiving a theatrical release) manages to seem longer than the original—despite being nearly 15 minutes shorter—and is ultimately both less eerily stylish and less compelling.

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MILLENNIUM ACTRESS – Review by Diane Carson

One of the outstanding features of Japanese animé is the artists’ attention to detail. Captivating stories intertwine complex characters’ political and personal circumstances, kept at a safe distance through animation, all the while presenting poignant content. Co-writer/director Satoshi Kon’s 2002 Millennium Actress comes close to achieving the highest artistry while delivering a bittersweet, deeply moving narrative.

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WHERE’D YOU GO, BERNADETTE – Review by Lana Wilson-Combs

In Director and Screenwriter Richard Linklater’s Where’d You Go, Bernadette,Cate Blanchette stars as the title character, Bernadette Fox, a well-respected Los Angeles architect who was on top of the world until a series of unfortunate events turned her life upside down. When Bernadette unexpectedly disappears from home, her husband (Billy Crudup) and young daughter, Bee (Emma Nelson) set out on an exciting adventure to find her, while Bernadette does some soul-searching of her own.

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SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK – Review by Susan Granger

Producer Guillermo del Toto (Pan’s Labyrinth) has created a socially conscious, surprisingly grim, ‘gateway horror’ anthology that’s PG-13, geared toward younger viewers, connecting Alvin Schwartz’s tales, grotesquely illustrated by Stephen Grammell, revolving around six teenagers in 1968, just before Richard Nixon’s election.

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LUCE – Review by Diane Carson

Director Julius Onah’s Luce trades on the perplexing challenge of accurately accessing character, even in individuals known quite well and occasionally on public display. Add to that a Rashomon factor, that is, the subjective trap for everyone of their own status and personality, and the complications multiply, the film’s audience included as we second guess our own judgments.

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