CIVIL WAR – Review by Susan Kamyab

Filmmaker Alex Garland’s fourth directorial feature hits harder than most war films. Civil War is a painfully realistic portrayal of a journey across dystopian future America driven by haunting characters, graphic visuals and heart-pounding sound effects. The film focuses on a team of four journalists following the Second American Civil War. Caught between the American government and “Western Forces”, they set out on a suicide mission through a surge of war crimes to reach the president before rebel coalitions strike the White House.

Read more

LATE NIGHT WITH THE DEVIL – Review by MaryAnn Johanson

I first saw this last year, and it has been embedded in my brain ever since, like an itchy splinter. I thought: This is an astonishing movie: uniquely fresh while also deeply lodged in the history of cinematic horror. But it’s now been a bit soured by the recent news that the filmmakers utilized “AI” “art” in their production design.

Read more

APOLONIA. APOLONIA- Review by Diane Carson

Apolonia, Apolonia follows an aspiring painter through her struggles. Danish director Lea Glob reports that during a 2009 Skype call Apolonia Sokol captured her attention with a composed, mesmerizing presence. Studying in the Danish Film School, required to complete a film project, Glob embarked on what later became a thirteen year collaboration resulting in the two hour documentary Apolonia, Apolonia revealing the daunting challenges to becoming a successful painter.

Read more

CANNIBAL MUKBANG – Review by Nadine Whitney

Aimee Kuge’s debut feature Cannibal Mukbang is an indie horror with heart… and liver… and plenty of other fleshy bits. A romance, satire, revenge thriller, and a film for the chronically online. Paying homage to low budget exploitation genre movies, Cannibal Mukbang is also a savvy dive into pernicious capitalism, misogyny, and “ethical consumption.” Cannibal Mukbang is the kind of film which comes bolting out of the gates heading straight to the jugular and tugging at the audience’s heartstrings. A tragicomic romance with cannibalism as a sensually transmitted “disease” and a stick in the eye satire on capitalism and our cultural relationship to being fed. Cannibal Mukbang is one hell of a calling card for Aimee Kuge, and a sizzling debut.

Read more

SCOOP – Review by Susan Granger

Scoop, Netflix’s drama about the downfall of Prince Andrew, drives home the old proverb – “If you lie down with dogs, you get up with fleas” – a warning to be mindful of who we surround ourselves with and what behavior we condone. The plot of Scoop revolves around how – back in 2019 – the BBC secured an exclusive interview with the Duke of York about his friendship with convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein. The broadcast ultimately triggered Andrew’s disgrace, confiscating his HRH title, patronages and removing him from Royal life.

Read more

CIVIL WAR – Review by Diane Carson

Civil War warns but doesn’t inform. Writer/director Alex Garland’s new film Civil War is just that, about a U.S. civil war. Don’t look for any issues beyond learning that California and Texas, yes, those two alone and together, have. As a dystopian reality terrorizes the country, four journalists undertake a road trip from New York to Charlottesville, Virginia, front lines of the rebellion.

Read more

CIVIL WAR – Review by Valerie Kalfrin

In Civil War, writer-director Alex Garland depicts the last days of democracy, staging intense courtyard firefights, street riots, and soldiers firing RPGs at the Lincoln Memorial. Yet his dystopian vision isn’t just out to provoke. Reminiscent of other journalism war films such as 1984’s The Killing Fields, with characters struggling to make sense out of chaos, this is an intelligent, propulsive, and shattering film about the costs of division and the toll of recording history.

Read more

CIVIL WAR – Review by Leslie Combemale

What’s in a name? In the case of writer/director Alex Garland’s Civil War, it might mean the difference between the success of a worthy film and a stumble at the box office. He’s not trying to make a stand about what’s happening in America. He’s not trying to be subjective in that way. Civil War is more about the impact of combat journalists committed to uncovering the raw truth of war; that it is brutal and senseless. Folks walking into the theater hungry for him to take a political stand about the potential dangers of polarization currently happening in the US will not be sated. If, however, they are looking for a powerful cinematic experience that shakes them to their foundations, that they’ll get. Not exactly an enjoyable experience, Civil War is a near-constant assault to the senses that amps up the tension moment by moment to the film’s last frames that will become essential viewing in anyone’s list of great war movies.

Read more

CIVIL WAR – Review by T.J. Callahan

They shoot journalists don’t they? In Alex Garland’s Civil War they sure do…and everything else that moves within an inch of its life. This Civil War is not an historical drama, but a cautionary tale of what could lie ahead for the United States when democracy teeters on the brink of collapse. Set in the near future, Civil War is an almost documentary type chronicling of embedded war journalists on a road trip to Washington, D.C. trying to get one last interview with the President before he flees the White House. Civil War isn’t meant to be political. Garland doesn’t even give a reason for the unrest. All we know is California and Texas have seceded from the Union and have banded together to form the Western Federation in an attempt to take control of the dystopian government. There’s no right or wrong. No good or bad.

Read more