AVIVA – Review by Maitland McDonagh

Writer-director Boaz Yakin’s boldly unconventional, often exhilarating exploration of modern love revolves around two dancers, Aviva and Eden, and their complicated evolving relationship. Dance is a vital part of their identities, which Aviva delves into intimately through the prism of gender fluidity that embraces the notion that strength and submission, sacrifice and selfishness aren’t inherently gendered or even necessarily opposites.

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RED SNOW – Review by Alexandra Heller-Nicholas

By reducing that almost-always privileged figure of the white man to a barely glimpsed footnote in the story centered on Gwichʼin and Afghan characters, Métis filmmaker Marie Clements’ Red Snow is a reminder that there are new, important ways to approach genres where we might assume we’ve seen it all before.

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THE HIGH NOTE – Review by Lois Alter Mark

After seeing the trailer for the dozenth time, I admit I didn’t have high hopes for The High Note, which looked like generic rom-com-ish fluff. But, thanks to solid performances by Tracee Ellis Ross, Dakota Johnson, Kelvin Harrison, Jr. and Ice Cube, the movie rises above its genre to become truly compelling.

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I WILL MAKE YOU MINE – Review by Marina Antunes

Director Lynn Chen’s movie about three women in love with the same man captures the awkwardness of old relationships that are not quite rekindled but not quite dead in a manner that is sometimes uncomfortable to watch, but it’s refreshing to see three female leads confront their feelings head-on and come out the other side happier and ready to tackle the world.

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New LOONEY TUNES @ HBO MAX – Review by Leslie Combemale

Featuring fave characters like Bugs Bunny, Porky Pig, Daffy Duck, Wile E. Coyote and the Road Runner, as well as Tweety and Sylvester, the delightful new HBO Max Looney Tunes Cartoons series is takes its style and substance from the earliest — now classic — Warner Brothers cartoons.

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JOAN OF ARC – Review by Diane Carson

Imaginative telling is the reason for revisiting the celebrated story of Joan, burned at the stake in 1431 as a heretic at age 19. Director Bruno Dumont stages his Joan as a series of theatrical exchanges with talking and singing about battles that are presented as equestrian ballets, mockery of the church interrogators and jumping ahead over action scenes described but always unseen.

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PICTURE OF HIS LIFE – Review by Carol Cling

The documentary dives deep into Amos Nachoum’s background, exploring how, and why the Israeli photographer became a celebrated scuba diver and photographer, specializing in face-to-face images of killer whales, sharks and other underwater creatures. There’s stirring contrast between the stark Arctic setting and the grizzled, dogged “soldier of Mother Nature” dedicated to shooting photos instead of bullets.

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