JOKER – Review by Sarah Knight Adamson

The painfully sad backstory transformation of a depressed, clinically ill Arthur Fleck, to that of a sociopath killer, a.k.a. Joker is extremely tough to view. He’s prescribed seven different medications for depression, and tells his caseworker he wants more meds so he can stop feeling so awful. He’s told that the government is cutting back funds, and that she can do nothing more to help him, and that she’ll not be seeing him in the future. Here, society turns it’s back again on Arthur, sending a statement about mental health care.

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK October 11, 2019: DILILI IN PARIS

Michel Ocelot’s Dilili in Paris isn’t your standard animated kids’ fare — not by a long shot. And that’s a good thing. With its sophisticated Belle Epoque setting and parade of cultural and artistic figures and references, it’s almost like taking a trip to a colorful, informative, interactive museum. Which is somewhat apropos, given that we first meet young Dilili (voiced by Prunelle Charles-Ambron) when she’s participating in a living cultural exhibit of the Kanak people.

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LITTLE JOE – Review by Alexandra Heller-Nicholas

Recently playing at Austin’s Fantastic Fest after competing for the Palme d’Or at this year’s Cannes Film Festival (and winning Emily Beecham Best Actress award), Jessica Hausner’s English-language debut feature Little Joe in many was recalls her 2004 feature Hotel with its particular utilization of genre as a way to explore the relationship between women, identity and labor

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PELICAN BLOOD.- Review by Alexandra Heller-Nicholas

With the recent US premiere of her latest film Pelican Blood at Fantastic Fest, Katrin Gebbe returns once again to appreciative audiences in Austin after her fearless 2013 debut film Nothing Bad Can Happen. With the latter devastating audiences across the globe since its world premiere in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival, Pelican Blood reveals Gebbe to be a filmmaker now in full flight, more than capable of tackling confronting difficult questions around cliché-defying representations of mother-child bonds.

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ABOMINABLE – Review by Brandy McDonnell

Mostly aimed at the 10 and younger crowd, the movie offers plenty of eye-popping and ear-pleasing spectacle for all ages, from gorgeous scenes at the Leshan Giant Buddha in Sichuan, where Yi plays a violin cover of Coldplay so beautiful that it conjures natural wonders, to a glitzy sequence on the Shanghai Tower, where the kids use the mega-skyscraper’s daily light show to ditch Burnish’s thugs.

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NATIONAL THEATER LIVE: FLEABAG – Review by Sarah Knight Adamson

Now, film enthusiasts will be able to see Phoebe Waller-Bridge’ work first-hand in her one-woman monologue through the sixty-five-minute event titled, National Theater Live: Fleabag, playing in theaters in London, and beginning this Saturday in Chicago at the Gene Siskel Film Center, with more theaters to be announced.

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JUDY – Review by Diane Carson

Simply titled Judy, director Rupert Goold’s film tackles the last year of Judy Garland’s life, 1968 to 1969. On the whole, it is not a happy one, given Judy’s reliance on alcohol and pills, a self-destructive addiction explored in flashbacks to MGM studio head Louis B. Mayer’s abusive treatment of her during the 1939 shoot of The Wizard of Oz.

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