HOUSE OF GUCCI – Review by Susan Granger

Ridley Scott’s extravagant melodrama House of Gucci delves into what led to the 1995 murder of Maurizio Gucci, scion of the Milan-based fashion family.

This sordid saga of love, backstabbing and betrayal begins as Patrizia Reggiani (Lady Gaga), an accountant at her father’s trucking company, sets her sights on bespectacled Maurizio Gucci (Adam Driver), whom she meets at a disco party. Although he’s smitten, his suave, snobbish father Rodolfo (Jeremy Irons) spots her as a crass, social-climbing gold-digger.

Read more

HOUSE OF GUCCI – Review by Liz Braun

Every bit as plastique and fabulous as a knock-off designer handbag, House of Gucci is a wildly entertaining soap opera about people fighting over money, from director Ridley Scott. .Based on a real-life story of greed and betrayal and tragedy, in the telling here it is busy and beautiful to look at. There are a couple of leaps in the storytelling that don’t quite add up and a complaint might be lodged about some of the more melodramatic bits — but it’s all so visually dazzling and fun to watch that none of these quibbles add up to much.

Read more

HOUSE OF GUCCI – Review by Diane Carson

House of Gucci chronicles unpleasant events regarding this fashion brand. Based on Sara Gay Forden’s 2001 book The House of Gucci: A Sensational Story of Murder, Madness, Glamour, and Greed, the four elements emphasized in her title pinpoint the essence of the drama. Announced on screen as “inspired by true events,” it has, nevertheless, received extensive Gucci family criticism, the book and the film. No wonder, for no one comes off admirably depicted.

Read more

ANNETTE – Review by Martha K Baker

Annette is not wholly successful, but that’s all right because it’s wholly mesmerizing. It begins with the cast and crew introducing themselves and the film to follow in procession. The film is a collaboration between scriptwriters Ron and Russell Mael (the band Sparks) and director Leon Carax. This opening number is meant to throw you off. It’s a bumpy ride. Annette is also unforgettable as journey more than destination.

Read more

ANNETTE – Review by Susan Granger

Annette is an eccentric, hallucinatory rock opera about love, passion and celebrity, set in Los Angeles. It begins as a voiceover cautions viewers not to “sing, laugh, clap, cry, yawn, boo or fart,” adding “breathing will not be tolerated during the show so, please, take a deep last breath right now.”

Read more

ANNETTE – Review by Barbara Goslawski

Part fantasy, part cheeky treatise on modern life, Annette is very much a film of extremes, one that struggles to reconcile its differences. Director Leos Carax deservedly won the Director’s prize at Cannes– this is certainly an athletic effort on his part – but Annette remains a frustrating experiment in form and content.

Read more

ANNETTE – Review by Leslie Combemale

From the first moments of the ambitious, sometimes stubbornly weird, sometimes magical film Annette, from director Leos Carax and writer/composers Ron and Russell Mael, known together as Sparks, you already know you’re in for something different and original. Carax talks directly to the audience, breaking the fourth wall, then the entire cast and crew get together and walk through the night streets singing ‘So May We Start?’.

Read more

STAR WARS: THE RISE OF SKYWALKER – Review by Diane Carson

Director/co-writer J.J. Abrams reports intense apprehension about taking on the ninth (and last) chapter in the latest Star Wars trilogy. At the helm, Abrams and the hundreds who contributed their talents to this much-anticipated endeavor present a worthy addition to the saga. Flawless editing flashes through breathtaking action sequences with zing and flair, animating skirmishes while enjoyably increasing most fans’ blood pressure.

Read more

MARRIAGE STORY – Review by Brandy McDonnell

It’s also one of those films that never lets you forget you’re watching a film, with a stagy quality that feels like you’ve been invited to see Driver, Scarlett Johansson, Laura Dern, Ray Liotta and Alan Alda one-up each other in an exclusive acting workshop with Baumbach providing slightly outlandish material liberally sourced from his own life.

Read more