WINGWOMEN – Review by Valerie Kalfrin

Mélanie Laurent’s latest feature, Wingwomen, is a comedic crime caper that feels like a departure from the drama of 2021’s The Mad Women’s Ball. But just as the crime yarn in her indie feature Galveston (2018) took a backseat to the tender relationship between its leads, Wingwomen uses its heists and violence as window dressing. Now airing on Netflix, it’s more about female friendship and how the right people always have your back—albeit sometimes through the scope of a gun.

Read more

PASSAGES (Melbourne IFF 2023) – Review by Alexandra Heller-Nicholas

Eschewing the excesses of the typical love triangle melodrama, Ira Sachs’s Passages is a matter-of-fact portrait of love found and love lost held aloft by weighty performances by its three stellar leads, Franz Rogowski, Ben Wishaw and Adèle Exarchopoulos. Rogowski’s Tomas is at the center of the unfolding drama, an flighty and insecure filmmaker who is largely kept grounded by his sensible husband Martin (Wishaw) to whom he has been married for well over a decade.

Read more

THE FIVE DEVILS – Review by Diane Carson

French director Léa Mysius’ The Five Devils is enigmatic, at times compelling, but ultimately puzzling and disappointing. The story focuses on eight-year-old Vicky who possesses a hypersensitive sense of smell and an ability to mix powerful potions leaving individuals unconscious. She benefits from her ability to travel back in time where she learns unpleasant secrets of violent events. The title, The Five Devils, suggests a comment on the five central characters that, in the final analysis, are reconsidered in what appears to be a meaningful flashback. It didn’t work for me.

Read more

THE FIVE DEVILS – Review by Nadine Whitney

Blending supernatural elements to tell the story of consuming love The Five Devils is a seductive and uneasy mystery that encompasses racism and homophobia, as well as the sadness that two people face when they are in a marriage that suits neither of them. Léa Mysius’ skills as a director are in full force in The Five Devils. The visuals are striking and haunting and complement the strangeness of their script.

Read more

MOVIE OF THE WEEK September 18, 2020: SIBYL

The line between life and art becomes very blurred in Sibyl, French feminist filmmaker Justine Triet’s intimate, ethically complex drama about the titular Sibyl (Virginie Efira), an emotionally fragile psychotherapist who finds inspiration for her novel in her patient’s complicated life. But can she deal with her own insecurities and past entanglements?

Read more

SIBYL – Review by Loren King

Sibyl deftly balances romantic thriller and delicious drama with comic overtones about movie making. It’s one of the best on this rich subject since Truffaut’s classic Day For Night. Sibyl is a smart, surprising and sophisticated movie for adults, a refreshing reprieve from low bar moviemaking.

Read more