BURDEN – Review by Martha K Baker

One of the many aspects of “Burden” worthy of attention is that it’s set in 1996. Writer/Director Andrew Heckler based the script on a report in real life about Klu Klux Klansmen. Not in the 19th century or even in the 1950s when all those Confederate statues were erected to intimidate African-Americans. 1996.

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK February 21, 2020: THE KINDNESS OF STRANGERS

Help comes from unexpected places when needed the most in The Kindness of Strangers, Lone Scherfig’s heartfelt drama about a handful of people whose lives intersect amid the bustling anonymity of New York City. Centering on the plight of a woman who flees an abusive marriage with her two young sons, the narrative shows how circumstances — and life itself — can turn on a dime.

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THE KINDNESS OF STRANGERS – Review by Cate Marquis

Zoe Kazan and a fine ensemble of actors play characters on the margins of life in Manhattan in Danish writer/director Lone Scherfig’s The Kindness of Strangers. The narrative has a stream of dark comedy as it follows the lives of a mixed bag of struggling strangers.

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THE KINDNESS OF STRANGERS – Review by Susan Wloszczyna

The Kindness of Strangers‘ capable cast of actors is topped by Zoe Kazan as Clara, a young mother who runs away from Buffalo to New York City to save her sons from their father, an abusive cop who gets off on violence. With little means to support herself and no safe haven that she can afford for her kids save for libraries, she does what the title says – she reaches out to average citizens who just happen to be do-gooders.

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THE KINDNESS OF STRANGERS – Review by Sheila Roberts

Written and directed by Scherfig, the New York City drama features an impressive ensemble cast that includes Zoe Kazan, Andrea Riseborough, Bill Nighy, Caleb Landry Jones, Jay Baruchel and Tahar Rahim. Scherfig attempts to write an authentic story that will resonate with audiences, including those that may have never experienced such bleak situations in their own lives.

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THE DEATH OF STALIN – Review by Martha P. Nochimson

You can’t get a better deflector for these dark days in the United States than a serio-comic farce set in the now defunct Soviet Union in 1953, as the mammoth country was given an opportunity to emerge from the rigid structure of Stalin’s tyranny. The Death of Stalin (2017) directed by political satirist Armando Ianucci is such film, a comic tour de force about the anarchy hidden within despotism.

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SPOTLIGHT June 2018: Andrea Riseborough, Actress, Director, Producer, Outspoken Activist

awfj spotlight black littleAndrea Riseborough’s filmography exemplifies strong female characters and diversity on screen. Dedicated, accomplished and passionate as a feminist actor/producer, Riseborough now adds writing/directing to her arsenal, making her a quadruple protagonist for gender equality in a movie industry that still underrepresents and misrepresents women. Continue reading…

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THE DEATH OF STALIN — Review by Martha K. Baker

“The Death of Stalin” does not purport to be history, so anyone going to learn about this moment in Russian history will be terribly confused. Anyone going to see satire about anarchy will be satisfied. There’s no way to see this film without thinking of the reports out of the White House concerning process chaos and policy chaos, something that the current administration admittedly thrives on.

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AWFJ Movie of the Week, Oct. 13-19: BIRDMAN

Opening Oct. 17, AWFJ’s Movie of the Week is Birdman, which sees the welcome return of Michael Keaton as a washed up actor trying to reclaim past glories by staging a play on Broadway. Directed by Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, the hugely talented filmmaker behind the likes of Amores Perros, 21 Grams and Babel, and powered by a virtuoso performance from Keaton, Birdman is a knowing – and hugely entertaining – treatise on the fickle nature of fame.
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