THE VIRTUOSO – Review by Susan Granger

What a shame that – after winning the 2021 Best Actor Academy Award for The Father – Anthony Hopkins’ new neo-noir thriller is such a dud! The titular character (Anson Mount) is a nameless contract killer, a methodical mercenary, who shows no remorse about the way he earns a living…until a woman, an innocent bystander, is burned to death in front of her young child. He knows it’s “collateral damage,” but the horror awakens his conscience.

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THE FATHER – Review by Diane Carson

Director Florian Zeller realistically depicts the mental confusion of octogenarian Anthony who weaves in and out of reality, struggling with a dementia he refuses to acknowledge, one symptom of his cognitive deterioration. Second, Anthony’s primary caregiver, daughter Anne, elicits empathy through scenes focusing on her painful coping.

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THE FATHER – Review by Susan Granger

First seen sitting in a chair, reading a book while listening to classical music in his posh London flat, Anthony Hopkins delivers a heartbreaking performance as an 80-year-old gentleman trying to come to terms with the subtle disorientation of dementia. At this point, Anthony – that’s his character’s name, since director Florian Zeller wrote the role for Hopkins – barely recognizes his daughter, Anne (Olivia Colman), who is trying to introduce him to Laura (Imogen Poots), a new caregiver.

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Screenwriter Anthony McCarten on THE TWO POPES – Nell Minow interviews

Sometimes history is made by groups of people in labs or courtrooms or legislative bodies or battlefields. Sometimes history is made by two people talking to each other quietly. We hear those stories less often. It may be that what makes those changes possible is keeping them secret. Perhaps that is what makes imagining them so irresistible. That is what screenwriter Anthony McCarten has done in fact-based films like Bohemian Rhapsody, The Darkest Hour, and his latest, The Two Popes.

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THE TWO POPES – Review by Diane Carson

Metaphors comment unobtrusively on a variety of current issues: building bridges not walls, income inequality, tyranny, modest vs. indulgent life styles. These important topics are punctuated with nice touches of humor and music. The Two Popes speaks to everyone who examines, as honestly as possible, the decisions of their lives, whether Muslim, Jewish, Hindu, Catholic, Protestant, agnostic, atheist, or anything else.

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