ALL DIRT ROADS TASTE OF SALT (NYFF 2023) – Review by Margaret Barton-Fumo

Raven Jackson’s All Dirt Roads Taste of Salt is an ambitious debut, produced with the help of Barry Jenkins’ PASTEL production company. Zoomed in closely on the life of a young woman in rural Mississippi, Jackson’s film favors minute details and amplified emotions, resulting in a quite experimental feature. Parsing through shuffled scenes within a timeline that spans decades, one can intuit the main character Mack’s significant life events, without the aid of a talkative script.

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IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK – Review by Brandy McDonnell

In 1970s Harlem, childhood friends Tish Rivers and Fonny Hunt, inexorably, beautifully fall in love and look forward to building their life together. Their love story unfolds in nonlinear fashion, so by the time Tish realizes she is pregnant, her aspiring artist lover is already in prison, falsely accused of raping a Puerto Rican woman.

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KiKi Layne Talks BEALE STREET, Tish and Barry Jenkins – Nell Minow interviews

Kiki Layne has an extraordinary breakthrough performance in Barry Jenkins’ If Beale Street Could Talk, based on the 1974 novel by James Baldwin. She plays Tish, deeply in love with the unjustly accused Fonny (Stephan James) and pregnant with his child. In an interview, she discussed her early love of acting, creating the look of her character, and the challenge of doing justice to the voiceover narration, her character’s thoughts and Baldwin’s language.

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AWFJ EDA Awards for Best of 2016

The women of AWFJ have voted! The Alliance of Women Film Journalists is pleased to announce the winners of the tenth annual AWFJ EDA Awards. This year, AWFJ presents EDA Awards in 25 categories, divided into three sections: the standard ‘Best Of’ section, the Female Focus awards and the irreverent EDA Special Mention awards—including Actress Most in Need of a New Agent and the AWFJ Hall of Shame Award. Read on…

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AWFJ Movie of the Week, October 17 – October 21: Moonlight

The eight-year gap between Barry Jenkin’s first film Medicine for Melancholy and his sophomore follow-up Moonlight has been a source of some considerable anxiety for all the cinephiles eagerly awaiting Jenkins’s new work. Opening Oct. 21, AWFJ’s Movie of the Week is Moonlight, a political work in that it posits the experience of being black in the US, not with the triumphant exceptionalism of a film like The Birth of a Nation, but with attention and care to a common and shared humanity. Read More…

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