MASTERS OF THE AIR – Review by Susan Granger

From Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks, the same production team that gave us Band of Brothers (2001) and The Pacific (2010), comes a new, nine-part series Masters of the Air about the heroic W.W.II pilots who set the stage for D-Day. The 8th Air Force, 100th Bomber Group – known as the “Bloody Hundredth” because of their high casualty rate – was stationed at England’s Thorpe Abbotts Base. In less than six months in 1943, 34 out of 36 crews were shot down. Their high casualty count was attributed to their orders to fly daylight missions over Nazi-occupied territory, while the British stealthily dropped their bombs at night.

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SALTBURN – Review by Susan Granger

After Promising Young Woman (2022), Emerald Fennell’s auspicious writing/directing debut, her audacious second feature Saltburn is a disappointment. Set in 2006, it’s a twisted, kinky, social-climbing satire revolving around Oliver Quick (Irish actor Barry Keoghan), a guileless ‘scholarship’ Oxford undergrad who cleverly befriends handsome Felix Catton (Jacob Elordi), an aristocratic yet surprisingly compassionate classmate. According to Oliver’s tragic backstory, his parents suffered addiction/mental health problems before his father’s recent death – which is why it’s so important to him to wangle an invitation to spend the summer at Catton’s family’s Baroque country estate called Saltburn.

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SALTBURN – Review by Nadine Whitney

Emerald Fennell’s baroque psychosexual thriller wants you to have fun. There are lines that are spun with a golden malice. She has no pity for the upper crust and delights in displaying how insular they are and how easily they wield their wealth and titles. Their peccadillos are supposed to be transgressive, but in effect they are just the result of bored rich people needing their fix from extending a form of noblesse oblige.

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SALTBURN – Review by Diane Carson

Saltburn satirizes the ultrarich in 2006 England. How can a scholarship student at posh Oxford University, England, possibly fit in or relate to his privileged, silver-spoon-in-their-mouths classmates? In writer/director Emerald Fennell’s Saltburn, set in 2006, that’s the dilemma for poor Oliver Quick who looks as drab as others find him. But he has one advantageous attribute, i.e., he watches carefully and assesses individuals astutely.

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SALTBURN (Middleburg FF 2023) – Review by Leslie Combemale

From the moment the crimson red, Hammer horror-inspired opening titles show onscreen, the film warns it will not be your usual British uni coming of age story. It wouldn’t be, would it, given that it comes from Emerald Fennell, who brought us Promising Young Woman? That movie, Fennell’s feature debut as writer/director, won her a Oscar for Best Original Screenplay, and speaking of promise, made audiences and critics frothy to see what she’d do with her sophomore feature. Though not nearly as original as her first, Saltburn, a sexually transgressive tale of privilege and the desire to belong, allows its lead performer to shine brighter than a diamond encrusted dagger.

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WEEK IN WOMEN: Emerald Fennell’s SALTBURN set for holiday release – Brandy McDonnell reports

Oscar-winning writer-director Emerald Fennell will help kick off the cinematic holiday season when her Saltburn bows into theaters in limited release on Nov. 24, which is Black Friday. It will expand to additional theaters Dec. 1. Hailing from MRC Film and Amazon Studios, “Saltburn” also will reunite Fennell with two-time Academy Award nominee Carey Mulligan, who starred in Fennell’s 2020 feature film directorial debut Promising Young Woman.

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SALTBURN – Review by Serena Seghedoni

Emerald Fennell’s Saltburn is a wickedly subversive, exquisitely twisty character study that leaves no room for redemption and satisfying resolutions, and that’s the real genius of it. Fennell defies our expectations and delivers a clever character study disguised as an “eat the rich” satire, where everyone is a horrible person and absolutely deserves what they get.

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THE BANSHEES OF INISHERIN – Review by Jennifer Green

Categorized as a “musical or comedy,” Banshees is indeed laugh-out-loud funny at some of its more absurd moments. But it’s a dark humor that can almost make you feel bad about laughing once you realize just how tragic the characters and events director Martin McDonagh has scripted are. Their horizons are as limited as the view from their island, where an endlessly overcast sky vanishes into a grey sea.

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THE BANSHEES OF INISHERIN – Review by Susan Granger

Golden Globes nominees Colin Farrell and Brendan Gleeson deliver memorable performances in The Banshees of Inisherin but whether you want to spend two hours in their company on an isolated island off the coast of Ireland is purely a matter of choice. Set in 1923, this tragicomedy follows the fractured friendship of amiable Padraic Suilleabhain (Colin Farrell) and stolid Colm Doherty (Brendan Gleeson). Accustomed to meeting every afternoon for a pint of stout at the local pub, Padraic cannot understand why Colm now refuses to join him there – or even engage in conversation.

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THE BANSHEES OF INISHERIN – Review by Diane Carson

Writer/director Martin McDonagh engages head on and provocatively with confrontational characters battling anger management issues He again grabs the tiger by the tail, isolating his characters on a fictional island off Ireland’s northern coast in 1923. Best of friends, Colm Doherty and Padraic Súilleabháin head to the local, and only, pub for their pints and extended conversation every day. But this isn’t an ordinary afternoon, and friction ensues immediately.

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