GHOSTBUSTERS: FROZEN EMPIRE – Review by Valerie Kalfrin

Like its vault for containing trapped ghosts, Ghostbusters: Frozen Empire is creaky and overstuffed. Full of references to the 1984 original, it has a plot that’s more complicated that it needs to be, jarring errors in continuity and logic, and characters with little to do. That’s a shame because, along with a passionate fan base, the Ghostbusters franchise often mixes screwball shenanigans with heart. The gentle reboot of 2021’s Ghostbusters: Afterlife, while uneven, struck the right notes, following the daughter and grandchildren of Egon Spengler (the late Harold Ramis) in Oklahoma. The family uncovered a paranormal secret and reconnected with the surviving Ghostbusters, giving Egon a proper sendoff.

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GHOSTBUSTERS: Frozen Empire – Review by T.J. Callahan

After an ancient relic unleashes an evil force, the original and the new Ghostbusters combine to turn up the heat on a tall, dead and horny villain named Garraka whose mission is to bring on the second coming of the Ice Age in Ghostbusters:Frozen Empire. This 4th installment of the Ghostbusters franchise means well, but tries to do too much. There are multiple storylines throwing a myriad of particles and Stay Puft Marshmallow men at us that only make for paranormal plot holes. There’s an abundance of sarcasm and over acting from the younger performers with plenty of mugging for the camera by all.

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GHOSTBUSTERS: FROZEN EMPIRE – Revew by Susan Kamyab

In this newest sequel, the discovery of an ancient artifact unleashes an evil force, making Ghostbusters new and old join forces to protect their home and save the world from a second ice age. All the beloved cast from the previous film have returned, but this time around filmmaker Jason Reitman, son of Ivan Reitman, who directed the original movies, sticks to co-writing credits and Gil Kenan steps in as director. It’s possible this was the first mistake, as Ghostbusters: Frozen Empire is a disjointed mess, bloated with too many scattered storylines.

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THE GREATEST BEER RUN EVER – Review by Martha K Baker

The Greatest Beer Run Ever could have been just another bromance or a boy-farce, like The Hangover. It is more than either sub-genre, much more — maybe because it’s based on a real story, as farcical as that is. The film is well realized. John Donohue, called “Chick,” made his beer run to Vietnam in 1967. He had been in the military earlier, stationed in his home state of Massachusetts.

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THE GREATEST BEER RUN EVER – Review by T.J. Callahan

It’s 1967, the Vietnam War is raging and so are opinions on America’s participation in the fight. Zac Efron is John “Chickie” Donahue. A guy in flux who needs to do something that makes a difference. He decides to give his buddies in combat a taste of home, but he ends up getting a big gulp of the battle instead.

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THE GREATEST BEER RUN EVER – Review by Susan Granger

While America’s involvement in the Vietnam War remains controversial, films like The Deer Hunter, Apocalypse Now and Ken Burns’ documentary, have reflected on the conflict’s psychological aspects. So The Greatest Beer Run Ever is a refreshingly entertaining comedic drama, focusing on a crowd-pleasing, behind-the-scenes glimpse of a globe-spanning beer run.

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ON THE ROCKS – Review by Diane Carson

Writer/director Sofia Coppola tackles recognizable, perplexing situations with observational skill. Through calm restraint that communicates volumes, she reveals complex characters who struggle with relationships. In her latest film, Laura slowly but surely begins to suspect that husband Dean is having an affair with his assistant. On the Rocks is quiet, restrained, and wonderful.

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ON THE ROCKS – Review by Susan Granger

Obsessed with the concept of monogamy/marital fidelity, writer/director Sofia Coppola conveys her smart, sophisticated, incisive observations about men, no doubt formed by the dynastic Coppola family and her first marriage to director Spike Jonze. On the Rocks revolves around a meddling father, his anxious daughter and a marriage that may or may not be falling apart.

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK October 23, 2020: ON THE ROCKS

On the Rocks feels a bit like what you’d get if Woody Allen and Wes Anderson made a movie together — only with a lot more feminine energy, empathy, and understanding. Sofia Coppola’s dramedy tackles modern marriage, motherhood, career uncertainty, and parent/adult child relationships with a light touch and strong performances from a talented cast.

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ON THE ROCKS – Review by Nikki Baughan

The reteaming of filmmaker Sofia Coppola and star Bill Murray is a tantalising proposition for the many fans of their previous collaborations, such as A Very Murray Christmas (2015) and, of course, Lost in Translation (2003). The two have developed an easy rapport over the years, with Coppola knowing how to let Murray’s charisma shine through without overwhelming everything around him; and that balance, together with the addition of the always-excellent Rashida Jones into the mix, makes On the Rocks a hugely appetising confection.

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