MOVIE OF THE WEEK January 14, 2022 – WHO WE ARE: A CHRONICLE OF RACISM IN AMERICA

Once more, for those in the back: The United States is a racist country. As lawyer Jeffrey Robinson, the deputy legal director and director of the Trone Center for Justice & Equality at the ACLU, clearly and eloquently reminds viewers in Sarah Kunstler and Emily Kunstler’s must-see documentary Who We Are: A Chronicle of Racism in America, the U.S. was founded by White men who enslaved Black people, and that legacy has had an impact on everything that has come since.

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WHO WE ARE: A CHRONICLE OF RACISM IN AMERICA – Review by Susan Wloszczyna

In the documentary Who We Are, Black attorney Jeffrey Robinson, who has been a lawyer for 40 years, performs as the film’s screenwriter, presenter and star as he delivers a lecture on about how our country continues to push aside our increasing divisions when it comes to our ingrained culture that still embraces white supremacy and institutionalized racism in our society. Here is a man, we are told, who is about to argue his most important case.

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WHO WE ARE: A CHRONICLE OF RACISM IN AMERICA – Review by Liz Whittemore

As if he were giving the closing argument of a lifetime, lawyer, author, and activist Jeffery Robinson seamlessly lays out how America is one of the most racist countries in the world. The pervasive culture of white supremacy began the instant the original colonizers from Europe arrived. Robinson explains the fundamental laws created and enforced by the first Americans and the generations who followed. Some of these laws made me gasp in horror. As Jeffrey Robinson runs down the articles in The Constitution, you will feel like you know nothing. Why had I never heard of much of this information before?

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BLOOD BROTHERS – Review by Martha K Baker

They were friends, these two men, friends and brothers by admiration and affection. But not for long. Director Marcus Clarke bases his fine double-bio-doc of Malcolm X and Muhammad Ali on Johnny Smith and Randy Roberts’ biography, Blood Brothers, and lifts it off the page. Blood Brothers, a compact filmic lesson in Black history, is shot through with compassion and insight.

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