SHE CAME TO ME – Review by Leslie Combemale

Tthe audacious, bizarre, inconceivable dramedy will prove to be a favorite to quirky indie fans. There’s care and consideration in every aspect of the production, from the awards-heavy cast, to the careful color stories in the production design, to the embarrassment of riches offered up in the score and music. Writer/director Rebecca Miller gives her characters real issues, often to the point of mental illness, and they are issues that build interactions and relationships that offer less clearcut hero/villain scenarios, thereby making them worlds more interesting. She collaborated with her cast in developing their roles, and it shows in the commitment the performers give to their performances. The result is a sort of screwball comedy meets magical realism, with a lot of heart thrown in.

Read more

JAZZ FEST: A NEW ORLEANS STORY – Review by Marilyn Ferdinand

Jazz, America’s great musical invention, has won enthusiastic fans the world over, but none moreso than those who rocked its cradle in the place of its birth—New Orleans. The annual New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival draws more than 100,000 people each of its seven days to hear jazz and its many musical offshoots on more than a dozen stages, eat arguably the best food on the planet, enjoy crafts booths and exhibits, and absorb the unique energy and spirit that any visitor to the Crescent City feels the moment their feet hit the ground.

Read more

Gurinder Chadha on BLINDED BY THE LIGHT, Human Dignity, Brexit and the Boss – Leslie Combemale interviews

Writer/director/producer Gurinder Chadha is one of the UK’s most beloved, prolific filmmakers. The fact that she’s female seems incidental. She landed on Hollywood’s radar with Bend it Like Beckham (2002), which threw Keira Knightly’s career into hyperdrive. Among her films is the Jane Austin fan cult favorite, , Bride and Prejudice. She’s developing an animated musical series, Pashmina, for Netflix. I spoke to Gurinder about her new film, Blinded by the Light, about the joy that carries through the movie, the universal power of Bruce Springsteen, and how she believes being a woman impacts her work as a filmmaker.

Read more