WEEK IN WOMEN: Blanchett’s Dirty Films inks first-look with New Republic – Brandy McDonnell reports

Two-time Oscar winner Cate Blachett has inked a first-look feature film production deal for her Dirty Films production company with New Republic Pictures, headed by Brian Oliver and Bradley Fischer. Oliver, who received a Best Picture Academy Award nod in 2011 for Black Swan, formed New Republic in 2017. The company was big in the mix in this year’s Oscars, having backed the films 1917 and Rocketman last year.

Read more

STATELESS – Review by Martha K Baker

Stateless universalizes a true story from Australia’s recent history: there’s no way to watch it without thinking of the cages on America’s border with Mexico or the countless Syrian refugees. Stateless builds and builds as it tells a very painful, very needed, truly inspired story of the boundaries of land and law.

Read more

MRS. AMERICA – Review by Susan Granger

It’s fascinating how many young people have never heard of Phyllis Schlafly and how many older folk have forgotten her grassroots opposition to the Equal Rights Amendment back in the 1970s. It’s dauntingly relevant to realize that – a century after female suffrage became the law of the land – there’s still no constitutional ban on discrimination against women.

Read more

WEEK IN WOMEN: Dahvi Waller Premieres MRS. AMERICA on FX/Hulu – Brandy McDonnell reports

Primetime Emmy-winning writer and producer Dahvi Waller, whose premier previous credits include Mad Men and Halt and Catch Fire was looking for an intriguing angle to delve into 1970s feminism, and she found it in Mrs. America.

Read more

WEEK IN WOMEN: Cate Blanchett, President of Venice International Film Fest Jury – Brandy McDonnell reports

Two-time Academy Award winner Cate Blanchett will serve as the president of the international jury of the competition at the 77th Venice International Film Festival in September. Led by the Australian actor/producer, the jury will decide on the Golden Lion for best film and other awards.

Read more

WHERE’D YOU GO, BERNADETTE – Review by Susan Granger

Richard Linklater’s adaptation of Maria Semple’s 2012 best-seller doesn’t make a smooth transition to the screen.
Semple’s anarchic, non-linear story revolves around an affluent, if eccentric, middle-aged woman who submerges her identity with that of her family, losing her sense of self. On paper, her daughter’s inner thoughts propel the narrative. On-film, this doesn’t work.

Read more