MOVIE OF THE WEEK October 19, 2018: CAN YOU EVER FORGIVE ME?

Melissa McCarthy trades pratfalls and slapstick for wry wit and introspection in Marielle Heller’s keenly observed biopic “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” McCarthy plays biographer Lee Israel, whose brief time in the Manhattan publishing scene’s spotlight has passed, leaving her bitter, lonely, and strapped for cash, which ultimately leads to a life of literary crime. It’s a compelling role for McCarthy, who seems to relish the opportunity to take on more serious material.

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK October 5, 2018: ALL ABOUT NINA

motw logo 1-35Propelled by a raw, powerful performance from star Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Eva Vives’ debut feature All About Nina couldn’t be more timely or relevant. The story of a caustic stand-up comic whose drunken one-night stands and other self-destructive choices mask heartbreaking pain, it will resonate deeply with anyone who’s ever been afraid to let someone else get close.

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK September 28, 2018: JANE FONDA IN FIVE ACTS

“Trying to be perfect is a toxic journey,” says Jane Fonda in Susan Lacy’s revealing, deeply personal documentary Jane Fonda in Five Acts, and — after hearing stories she’s told for the previous two hours — it’s impossible to disagree. Fonda’s revelatory reflections on her life as actress and activist make it clear that giving herself permission to be imperfect let her become her happiest self.

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK September 21, 2018: COLETTE

Keira Knightley shines as the star of Wash Westmoreland’s “Colette,” a beautifully realized biopic about the early years of the celebrated French writer. Knightly immerses herself in the role, bringing Colette’s personal struggles — and self-awakening — vividly to life within the lavish Belle Epoche environs established with gorgeous sets, costumes and cimenatography.

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK September 14, 2018: A HAPPENING OF MONUMENTAL PROPORTIONS

Judy Greer is no slouch at making people laugh; as an actress.. A Happening of Monumental Proportions marks her debut behind the camera, directing others as they go about the serious business of creating humor. The result is a quirky, charming comedy about several Los Angelenos whose lives intersect over the course of a single day.

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK August 3, 1018: NIGHT COMES ON

motw logo 1-35Brilliantly authentic performances and a poignant, timely story, make Jordana Spiro’s superb debut feature a powerful drama about pain, regret, purpose, and sisterhood. It is the coming of age of a young Black woman named Angel (Dominique Fishback) whose once happy childhood fell victim to drugs and violence, leaving her angry and alone.

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK July 27, 2018: PUZZLE

motw logo 1-35Quiet but quite compelling, Puzzle pieces together the affecting story of a midlife suburban wife and mother (played by the brilliant Kelly Macdonald) whose innate talent for jigsaw puzzling pushes her beyond the borders of her humdrum domestic routine into an adventure of self-discovery.

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK July 20, 2018: 93Queen

motw logo 1-35Paula Eiselt’s documentary follows Rachel ‘Ruchie’ Freier, an Orthodox Jewish wife, mother and lawyer, as she launches an all-female ambulance corps to serve women of NY’s Hasidic community in Brooklyn. The result is a compelling glimpse inside an insular community and a fascinating portrait of a determined feminist.

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK July 13, 2018: DARK MONEY

motw logo 1-35If you’re already feeling cynical about the current state of our country, fair warning: Dark Money isn’t going to lighten your mental load. Kimberly Reed’s intelligent documentary is an important, timely expose of the dangers that shady funding of political campaigns poses to the democratic ideals that many Americans hold dear.

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK July 6, 2018: DARK RIVER

motw logo 1-30In Clio Barnard’s gripping drama about incest, Ruth Wilson plays an itinerant shepherd who returns to her family’s Yorkshire farm after her father’s death. Challenging her brother’s control of the place, she grapples with haunting memories of childhood abuse. Barnard’s raw, authentic style and Wilson’s spare, understated performance are devastating.

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