SPOTLIGHT November 2018: Catherine Hardwicke, Blockbuster Indie Filmmaker and Activist

This year marks a number of significant anniversaries for filmmaker Catherine Hardwicke, one of the most well-known and hardworking women directors in the business. 2018 marks both the 15th anniversary of the release of her debut film Thirteen and – in November – the 10th anniversary of one of the hugely successful supernatural romance blockbuster Twilight, granting a perfect reason to focus on Hardwicke’s career more broadly as this month’s Spotlight.

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WEEK IN WOMEN: Catherine Hardwicke says ‘there’s still a lot of work to do’ to bring gender parity to Hollywood – Brandy McDonnell reports

A decade after Catherine Hardwicke shattered records for female directors with the global success of the fantasy franchise-launching romantic drama “Twilight,” the director says there’s still not enough women working behind the camera. “we’ve got to get more representation in all the categories,” Hardwicke commented at the 45th Student Academy Awards ceremony at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills.

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From Comic-Con: #FemaleFilmmakerFunko for #FemaleFilmmakerFriday — Leslie Combemale comments

As an avid supporter of women in film, producing the annual Women Rocking Hollywoodpanel at Comic-Con is the highlight of my professional year, especially because I’ve found Comic-Con to be receptive and progressive about recognizing women in film. Comic-Con has pushed me to become a better critic and a bigger fan. Over the years, I’ve become an obsessive collector of Funko Pops, those wonderful figures that memorialize the movie icons I love. Continue reading…

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AWFJ Movie of the Week, November 3-November 9: MISS YOU ALREADY

Opening November 6, AWFJ’s Movie of the Week is Miss You Already, director Catherine Hardwicke’s (Thirteen, Twilight) drama about a lifelong female friendship put to the test by serious illness starring Drew Barrymore and Toni Collette. The title may bring to mind flippant adolescent attachments, but the film is an astute study of adult female friendships, as seen through the intense prism of terminal illness Read on…

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