YOUNG WOMAN AND THE SEA – Review by Diane Carson

Young Woman and the Sea profiles the great Trudy Ederle. Based on an inspirational true story, Norwegian director Joachim Rønning’s Young Woman and the Sea chronicles American swimmer Trudy Ederle who, in 1926, became the first woman to swim the twenty-one mile English Channel from Cape Gris-Nez, France, to Kingsdown, Kent. Based on Glenn Stout’s book, the story begins in 1914 New York with the General Slocum steamship fire.

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YOUNG WOMAN AND THE SEA – Review by Diane Carson

Young Woman and the Sea profiles the great Trudy Ederle, the first woman to swim the English Channel. Several complications, not revealed here, keep suspense in play. However, the film consistently shows its Disney pedigree, meaning there’s no subtlety or moral ambiguity. To its credit, it does expose the appalling sexism of women’s place in sport competition as well as social dictates for 1920s women, including arranged marriages in the Ederle home. The working class tenement does have a palpable presence.

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Rachel Lambert talks SOMETIMES I THINK ABOUT DYING – Rachel West Interviews

After debuting at the Sundance Film Festival in 2023, director Rachel Lambert’s Sometimes I Think About Dying is opening in theatres this week. The film follows Fran (Daisy Ridley), a woman who likes to think about dying. Finding an unexpected connection with a new colleague at work (Dave Merheje), Fran explores her idea of identity and loneliness as she finds new modes of human connection. AWFJ’s Rachel West spoke with Lambert about her new film, working with Daisy Ridley, and how three women came together to not only get the film made, but have it play the opening night of Sundance.

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THE MARSH KING’S DAUGHTER – Review by Valerie Kalfrin

For most of her adult life, Helena has felt cleaved in two, unsure of where she belongs. In one of the more powerful moments from The Marsh King’s Daughter, Daisy Ridley as Helena stands illuminated in headlights, detailing the homemade tattoos her father gave her as a child when they lived off the grid. He marked her first kill of a deer on her neck. Her first miss on her forearm. Dotted her cheeks to represent tears, so she’d never cry in front of him. Based on Karen Dionne’s best-selling book of the same name, the film The Marsh King’s Daughter feels unsure as well. It’s part psychological drama, part thriller, but not an effective whole.

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THE INVENTOR – Review by Valerie Kalfrin

To have a creative mind like Leonardo da Vinci’s is both a joy and a torment, as shown in the animated film The Inventor, which uses stop-motion puppets and hand-drawn animation to bring the famed Renaissance man and his thoughts to life. The Inventor is a whimsical and occasionally poignant look at a prolific artist with relatable anxieties that bring him down to earth.

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STAR WARS: THE RISE OF SKYWALKER – Review by Diane Carson

Director/co-writer J.J. Abrams reports intense apprehension about taking on the ninth (and last) chapter in the latest Star Wars trilogy. At the helm, Abrams and the hundreds who contributed their talents to this much-anticipated endeavor present a worthy addition to the saga. Flawless editing flashes through breathtaking action sequences with zing and flair, animating skirmishes while enjoyably increasing most fans’ blood pressure.

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK June 28, 2019: Claire McCarthy’s OPHELIA

Much analyzed and, according to many, much misunderstood, Ophelia has always been one of Shakespeare’s most enigmatic characters. With Ophelia, director Claire McCarthy and screenwriter Semi Chellas aim to demystify Hamlet’s lady love, turning her into a smart, fully fleshed-out woman with spirit and agency.

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The Female Perspective, Etheria Film Night and OPHELIA – Beth Accomando interviews

In this two-part Cinema Junkie podcast, Beth Accomando focuses on the female perspective in film by speaking with the director of programming at Etheria Film Night as well as the director of the new film Ophelia and the author who created the young adult book about seeing Shakespeare’s Hamlet” through the eyes of a young woman.

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OPHELIA – Review by Marilyn Ferdinand

The genius of William Shakespeare has been a bottomless well of inspiration for creators down through the ages—flexible enough to absorb all manner of revision, from modern dress to modern English, and timeless enough to speak to successive generations with the common language of the human heart. Novelist Lisa Klein published Ophelia, her revisionist take on Hamlet in 2006, and now director Claire McCarthy and screenwriter Semi Chellas have brought her vision to the screen.

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OPHELIA – Review by Loren King

Reexamining classic texts from a different perspective, particularly minor or neglected characters, is an enticing idea fraught with possibility and peril. Tom Stoppard’s absurdist play,
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead looked past Hamlet to the bit players. But what about Shakespeare’s women? Kudos to director Claire McCarthy and to Semi Chellas who adapted Lisa Klein’s young adult novel, for having the imagination and guts to take one of Hamlet’s most under-explored characters, the tragic Ophelia, and put her center stage.

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