FROM BAGHDAD TO THE BAY (OXFF2020) – Review by Diane Carson

Documentary director Erin Palmquist’s From Baghdad to the Bay takes the viewer on a roller coaster ride, following Ghazwan Alsharif from Baghdad to San Francisco, as the title accurately announces. With apologies to Charles Dickens, this modern-day tale of two cities does encompass the best of times and the worst of times for Alsharif.

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CRIP CAMP – Review by Martha K Baker

The subtitle for the excellent documentary, “Crip Camp,” now running on Netflix, is A Disability Revolution. That means a lot. Yes, the film begins with a camp in upstate New York that welcomed the disabled, but the film, like the camp, opened to wider possibilities. The subtitle speaks eloquently to that revolution.

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IN FLOWERS THROUGH SPACE (OXFF2020) – Review by Diane Carson

For anyone not conversant with the Fibonacci sequence, and that certainly includes me, In Flowers Through Space is an educational, cerebral and auditory experience that asks for one simple indulgence: abandon conventional, unadventurous ideas about music for at least its sixty-six minutes.

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WE ARE AS GODS (SXSW2020) – Review by Lois Alter Mark

Imagine if someone in real life was trying to bring back animals that were extinct. That idea is explored – epically – by directors David Alvarado and Jason Sussberg in their fascinating documentary, We Are As Gods, focusing on Stewart Brand, Whole Earth Catalog founder, environmentalist and leader of the counterculture since the 1960s.

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True/False Film Festival 2020 – Diane Carson reports

With the good fortune to occur just before Covid-19 necessitated the tough decision of cancellation or postponement, the True/False Film Festival went on as usual the first weekend of March (Thursday evening, March 5 through Sunday evening, March 8, 2020) in Columbia, Missouri.

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THE BOOKSELLERS – Review by Maitland McDonagh

Director/ producer/editor D.W Young’s documentary, The Booksellers, is dedicated to the proposition that reports of the death of print—especially books, but including magazines, pamphlets, posters, maps, journals and annotated photographic albums and stereopticon cards—have been greatly exaggerated. And I say at the outset, I completely agree.

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EVERYBODY’S EVERYTHING – Review by Diane Carson

For those who know Lil Peep’s music and persona, the documentary Everybody’s Everything offers a bittersweet immersion in his charisma and his sensitivity, as well as his tragic circumstances. Avoiding formulaic biopic pitfalls, directors Sebastian Jones and Ramez Silyan find a fresh approach: an appealing, clear-headed entree to the heart and mind of Gustav (Gus) Åhr, aka Lil Peep.

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