ENDANGERED (Tribeca 2022) – Review by Martha K Baker

“Governments attacking journalists are not new.” That is but one of the quotations to take home from Endangered, an HBO Documentary on the status of the press today. Other meaty quotations range from screams at reporters that “You are the enemy of the people!” to tempered analyses by the reporters themselves, such as, “This profound crisis is not going away.”

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McENROE (Tribeca 2022) – Review by Marilyn Ferdinand

Every moment of documentary director/screenwriter Barney Douglas’ film contains interesting information from famous eye witnesses, including other tennis greats, as well as from an open and honest John McEnroe. This film is vital viewing for anyone who wants to see and understand the achievements and heart of this champion.

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LEAVE NO TRACE (Tribeca 2022) – Review by Leslie Combemale

When Norman Rockwell began his long association with The Boy Scouts of American, he couldn’t possibly have imagined how much his romanticized, clean-cut, patriotic representation of the organization would aid in building a system tailor-made for pedophiles. The dozens of art images shown as part of the new documentary Leave No Trace are only one way filmmaker Irene Taylor lays out how the once storied, now infamous boy’s club promoted and branded itself as a safe, wholesome way to create a strong, healthy, loyal, and obedient young man. Leave No Trace recounts, often in shocking ways, just how far from the truth that really is, and has been nearly from their inception. Only in February 2022, the Boy Scouts of America reached a 2.7 billion agreement over sexual abuses that occurred over decades.

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THE WOBBLIES – Review by Martha K Baker

Why watch an old film about old people in an old protest? Well, if history is going to repeat itself, it might as well be documented and then reviewed. In an excellent version, remastered by the Museum of Modern Art, The Wobblies retrains a light on a landmark labor movement called the Industrial Workers of the World, or the IWW.

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WEEK IN WOMEN: Tribeca FF 2022 opens with JLo docu HALFTIME – Brandy McDonnell reports

New York’s 2022 Tribeca Film Festival will launch June 8 with the world premiere of Halftime at the United Palace in Washington Heights. Halftime is a new Netflix documentary film by director Amanda Micheli that follows global superstar Jennifer Lopez as she reflects on her milestones and evolution as an artist and navigates the second half of her career continuing to entertain, empower and inspire

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK May 27, 2022: SINCE I BEEN DOWN

Both infuriating and inspiring, Gilda Sheppard’s documentary Since I Been Down lays bare the fear and institutional racism that drive so much of the United States’ criminal justice system — but also shows how education and understanding can open minds and turn lives around. Focusing on the story of Kimonti Carter, a Black Tacoma, Wash., man who’s been incarcerated for murder since he was 18, it demands that viewers think critically about race, power, rehabilitation, and justice.

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SINCE I BEEN DOWN – Review by Jennifer Merin

Filmmaker Gilda Sheppard’s very sobering and sometimes heartbreaking documentary, Since I Been Down, is about the criminal justice system in the United States, particularly as it raises awareness about the lasting impact of three-strikes laws that have mandated life-without-parole sentences for juveniles, particular children of color, who’ve been convicted of crimes three times.

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SINCE I BEEN DOWN – Review by Leslie Combemale

Since I Been Down is a profoundly emotional experience for those with compassion and concern for where America is in this moment, in terms of the rampant racial inequality and systemic racism continuing to poison the country. Writer/director Gilda Sheppard focuses on Kimonti Carter, who is changing the incarceration environment from the inside of the prison system.

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK May 20, 2022 – FANNY: THE RIGHT TO ROCK

If you heard that David Bowie told Rolling Stone in 1999 that a group popular in the 1970s was “one of the finest f–ing rock bands of their time,” who would you guess he was talking about? Led Zepplin? The Who? Deep Purple? Wrong, wrong, and wrong. He was heaping praise on Fanny, the groundbreaking all-female band formed by Filipina sisters Jean and June Millington, whose story is told in Bobbi Jo Hart’s rousing documentary Fanny: The Right to Rock.

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FANNY: THE RIGHT TO ROCK – Review by Jennifer Merin

Fanny: The Right to Rock is filmmaker Bobbi Jo Hart’s completely captivating documentary about the first all-girl rock band, Fanny, and how this sisterhood of talented and tenacious Filipina women musicians almost became the female equivalent of The Beatles — but didn’t. But hopefully this lively film will bring them the recognition — read that as adoration — they deserve.

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