WICKED LITTLE LETTERS – Review by Lois Alter Mark

Wicked Little Letters is a freakin’ hoot of a film that could just as appropriately have been called ‘Women Cursing.’ Loosely based on a true story, it takes place in a small town in England in the 1920’s – a time pre-social media, when a poison pen letter could easily set off a full blown scandal. That this scandal is fueled by the antics of Olivia Colman and Jesse Buckley is what makes the movie so delicious. Colman plays Edith, a Bible-quoting spinster who lives with her parents. Her father is a nightmare, bossing her around and treating her like a child. When she receives anonymous letters calling her names like “foxy ass old whore,” everyone assumes her rebellious young neighbor, Rose (Buckley), wrote them. With its brilliant casting and all the fun of a British mystery, Thea Sharrock’s Wicked Little Letters is pure delight.

Read more

WICKED LITTLE LETTERS – Review by MaryAnn Johanson

There is nothing that either Olivia Colman or Jessie Buckley could possibly do that wouldn’t be worth watching. And now they butt heads onscreen for the first time. I adore Wicked Little Letters, a future comfort movie for me, a flick to revisit when I’m feeling low and in need of a cheerfully indecent, gloriously naughty pick-me-up.

Read more

WICKED LITTLE LETTERS – Review by Leslie Combemale

What happens when a filmmaker makes a movie and the studio doesn’t know how to market it? Wicked Little Letters, certainly. When they released the trailer, the film looked like a quirky Brit-com led by Olivia Colman and Jessie Buckley spouting pithy one-liners in their 1920’s costumes. Fans of BritBox and Acorn no doubt thought, “What’s not to love?” Be prepared, because that’s not at all what you get with this movie. What you get is dark, dark, and more dark, though delivered with the expertise only the best performers can provide.

Read more

WICKED LITTLE LETTERS (TIFF 2023) – Review by Liz Braun

Wicked Little Letters, a dark comedy about an actual scandal that rocked the village of Littlehampton in 1920, is a comical whodunnit and sting operation that broadcast (and spoof) the racism and misogyny of the era. The film has an exhilarating pace and is funny and broad, placing its social message in a lightweight wrapper for easy consumption. Various over-the-top scenes suggest the performers enjoyed making this movie as much as audiences will enjoy watching it.

Read more

MOVIE OF THE WEEK August 30, 2019: VITA & VIRGINIA

The real-life romance between writers Virginia Woolf and Vita Sackville-West takes center stage in Chanya Button’s provocative period drama Vita & Virginia. Exploring sexuality and passion, desire and connection, the film features strong performances by Gemma Arterton and Elizabeth Debicki, and a script by Eileen Atkins that effectively incorporates the two literary legends’ own words.

Read more

VITA & VIRGINIA – Review by Sheila Roberts

Vita & Virginia, Chanya Button’s moving biopic about the clandestine love affair between two fiercely independent, modernist 20th-century authors, the legendary Virginia Woolf (Elizabeth Debicki) and the lesser known novelist-poet Vita Sackville-West (Gemma Arterton), is firmly rooted in their writings and literary ambitions.

Read more

VITA & VIRGINIA – Review by Leslie Combemale

There is much to love about Vita & Virginia, the new release directed by Chanya Button, and co-written by Button and actress Eileen Atkins. Atkins adapted the story from her successful stage play, in which she starred as famed writer Virginia Woolf opposite Vanessa Redgrave, who portrayed her lover, socialite and intellectual Vita Sackville-West.

Read more

VITA & VIRGINIA – Review by Loren King

Vita and Virginia and, especially, Gemma Arterton’s role of Vita Sackville-West, has the daunting task of naturally drawing comparisons with the brilliant 1990 BBC miniseries Portrait of a Marriage with Janet McTeer’s masterful embodiment of Sackville-West during her passionate romance with Violette Keppel (Cathryn Harrison). In the new film, Sackville-West has moved on from Violette and becomes enamored of fellow writer Virginia Woolf (Elizabeth Debicki).

Read more

TEA WITH THE DAMES – Review by Martha K Baker

In the midst of movies that call for blood, curses, and mayhem, “em>Tea with the Dames offers those ingredients elegantly and eloquently from dames of the British realm who are also stars of stage and screen. At tea are Dame and Lady Joan Plowright, Dame Maggie Smith, Dame Judi Dench, and Dame Eileen Atkins.Tea with the Dames is literate, funny, poignant, a respite and a reminder. Utterly delicious, this tea with Champagne with the Dames.

Read more