GHOSTBUSTERS: FROZEN EMPIRE – Review by Valerie Kalfrin

Like its vault for containing trapped ghosts, Ghostbusters: Frozen Empire is creaky and overstuffed. Full of references to the 1984 original, it has a plot that’s more complicated that it needs to be, jarring errors in continuity and logic, and characters with little to do. That’s a shame because, along with a passionate fan base, the Ghostbusters franchise often mixes screwball shenanigans with heart. The gentle reboot of 2021’s Ghostbusters: Afterlife, while uneven, struck the right notes, following the daughter and grandchildren of Egon Spengler (the late Harold Ramis) in Oklahoma. The family uncovered a paranormal secret and reconnected with the surviving Ghostbusters, giving Egon a proper sendoff.

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GHOSTBUSTERS: Frozen Empire – Review by T.J. Callahan

After an ancient relic unleashes an evil force, the original and the new Ghostbusters combine to turn up the heat on a tall, dead and horny villain named Garraka whose mission is to bring on the second coming of the Ice Age in Ghostbusters:Frozen Empire. This 4th installment of the Ghostbusters franchise means well, but tries to do too much. There are multiple storylines throwing a myriad of particles and Stay Puft Marshmallow men at us that only make for paranormal plot holes. There’s an abundance of sarcasm and over acting from the younger performers with plenty of mugging for the camera by all.

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GHOSTBUSTERS: FROZEN EMPIRE – Revew by Susan Kamyab

In this newest sequel, the discovery of an ancient artifact unleashes an evil force, making Ghostbusters new and old join forces to protect their home and save the world from a second ice age. All the beloved cast from the previous film have returned, but this time around filmmaker Jason Reitman, son of Ivan Reitman, who directed the original movies, sticks to co-writing credits and Gil Kenan steps in as director. It’s possible this was the first mistake, as Ghostbusters: Frozen Empire is a disjointed mess, bloated with too many scattered storylines.

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PRISONER’S DAUGHTER – Review by Liz Braun

Catherine Hardwicke directs Brian Cox and Kate Beckinsale in Prisoner’s Daughter, a drama about family and second chances. The two leads alone should make you prick up your ears, but the movie, alas, is sunk by an overwrought screenplay. The story moves toward a burst of violence that upends everything that went before it, and that’s enough said about that. May we suggest that with a couple of exceptions — Mike Leigh, Todd Haynes, Ned Benson, maybe —men should not write domestic drama. Much has already been said about the lack of directing roles (and opportunity in general) for women in Hollywood. It seems a double shame that filmmaker Catherine Hardwicke and this excellent cast were all squandered on weak material.

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