THE TRAGEDY OF MACBETH – Review by Susan Granger

As a first-time solo director, Joel Coen takes a sparse, stylized look at one of Shakespeare’s most compelling plays. Filming in austere black-and-white, he presents an abstract physical world that’s filled with deep, geometric shadows, sharp angles and bleak walls, focusing on an ambitious middle-aged couple, determined to usurp political power in medieval Scotland.

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THE TRAGEDY OF MACBETH – Review by T. J. Callahan

Director Joel Coen goes solo as helmer for the first time with a stripped down version of Shakespeare in The Tragedy of Macbeth, starring his Oscar winning wife, Frances McDormand, and fellow Oscar winner, Denzel Washington as the Lady and Lord of the castle. The film was shot in just 36 days — in much the same way the Bard might have done it with all of the action filmed completely on a sound stage — but Coen was still able to fully convey the bleak tension and disquiet of the times.

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THE TRAGEDY OF MACBETH – Review by Diane Carson

Joel Coen has breathed new life into the Scottish play in The Tragedy of Macbeth. Of course we know the story of the ambitious, heinous Lord Macbeth who kills to be kind and of Lady Macbeth’s encouragement, all in the service of their own demons and ultimate defeat, so surprising to them. Birnham Wood will come to Dunsinane and “none of woman born/Shall harm Macbeth,” but that does not include Macduff “untimely ripped from his mother’s womb.”

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THE POST DISPATCH – Review by Susan Granger

Deftly scripted as an absurdly fanciful anthology, filled with piquant caricatures, The French Dispatch is meticulously crafted by Wes Anderson as an inventive, whimsical tribute to several generations of mannered storytellers who enriched the American literary landscape

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NOMADLAND – Review by Martha K Baker

Anyone who saw director Chloé Zhao’s impressive film, The Rider, expects her imprint to embellish, her choices to be signatory. Zhao’s screenplay, although based on Jessica Bruder’s eye-opening exposé about the lives of older, rootless workers, skews Bruder’s emphasis to Zhao’s. Like The Rider, Nomadland amalgamates documentary with narrative forms of film.

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NOMADLAND – Review by Susan Granger

In this migrant drama, Chloe Zhao paints a subtle portrait of a resilient woman determined to survive despite devastating loss. Widowed, 61 year-old Fern (Frances McDormand) lost everything in the 2008 financial collapse, including her home and her job in now-deserted Empire, Nevada. So she sets out alone across the American West in her ramshackle Ford Econoline van, joining a caravan of modern-day nomads, a rag-tag community, squatting in RV parks.

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NOMADLAND – Review by Leslie Combemale

The film examines the phenomenon of travelers going across the country in search of work, through the lens of a widow named Fern (McDormand), who lives in her van. Other than co-star David Strathairn, who plays a fellow nomad, the secondary characters are played by real people on the nomad community. McDormand, Zhao, and crew members lived out of vans during production. The result is a film that is beautiful and sad and unique. It will blow you away. 

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WEEK IN WOMEN: Chloe Zhao’s NOMADLAND Update – Brandy McDonnell reports

Chloé Zhao’s acclaimed drama Nomadland, starring Oscar winner Frances McDormand, made its NY premiere on September 26 as the Centerpiece film at the 58th New York Film Festival, Earlier this month, the film was lauded with the Golden Lion this year at the 77th Venice International Film Festival and awarded the Grolsch People’s Choice Award at the 45th Toronto International Film Festival. It is the first film to hold both honors.

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NOMADLAND (TIFF20) – Review by Susan Wloszczyna

Who but Frances McDormand could take on such mundane tasks as making peanut butter sandwiches, cleaning toilets and packing merchandise into Amazon boxes and transform such moments into a riveting cinematic experience? The two-time Oscar-winning best-actress for 1996’s Fargo and 2017’s Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri is at the top of her game in filmmaker Chloe Zhao’s Nomadland.

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WEEK IN WOMEN: WarnerMedia Launches Inclusion Initiative – Brandy McDonnell reports

Six months after best actress winner Frances McDormand delivered a figurative mic drop at the Oscars by championing the idea of inclusion riders, WarnerMedia – including Warner Bros., HBO and Turner — has announced a company-wide policy outlining its commitment to diversity and inclusion in front of and behind the camera.

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