INSIDE OUT 2 – Review by T.J. Callahan

It’s been 10 years since Pixar ventured into the mind of a young girl who was depressed about leaving her friends and moving from Minnesota to San Francisco, but it’s only been two years in the life of Riley. She’s 13 and seems to be happy, doing well in school and playing hockey with her two best friends. Joy, Anger, Fear, Disgust and Sadness have kept Riley’s “head” quarters running smoothly, but when Anxiety and her 3 E crew of Envy, Ennui and Embarrassment show up, cranium chaos ensues.

Read more

AISHA (Tribeca 2024) – Review by Sherin Nicole

Aisha charts the experiences of a young Nigerian woman as she seeks international protection in Ireland. Caught in limbo for years in Ireland’s immigration system, Aisha Osagie develops a friendship with former prisoner Conor Healy who she meets at one of the accommodation centers. Aisha and Conor’s growing friendship soon looks to be short lived as Aisha’s future in Ireland comes under threat. An inconvenient love becomes a balm for an asylum seeker during uncertain times in Ireland. Writer/director Frank Berry’s third feature is rooted in a starkly compelling reality so apt it could be a documentary. There is no paradox in saying Aisha is a study of hopeful despair.

Read more

AISHA – Review by April Neale

Smaller films can pack profoundly gargantuan messages about humanity and the pendulum of fate. Poor, in distress, and alone, Aisha, a young Nigerian woman seeking asylum in Ireland, is at the mercy of bureaucrats and paper pushers as she awaits her hearing to see if she qualifies for Irish residency and Visa status. The Stranger in a Strange Land plot is a well-worn road for many filmmakers, but in Aisha, Letitia Wright gives a subdued and powerful turn as the titular young woman who struggles to maintain her dignity against the threat of deportation. As with all tales of this nature, there are bad actors and good souls, as this Nigerian refugee is not only sticking out like a sore thumb thanks to her race and religion (she is Islamic) but her days spent held in a Dublin detention center are made bearable by the kindness of an Irish security guard, played with great restraint and presence by Josh O’Connor.

Read more