AWARDS INTELLIGENCER: Here Come the Canadian Screen Awards – Thelma Adams reports

The 12th Annual Canadian Screen Awards are announced at a televised Awards Ceremony gala broadcast on the CBC, as the culmination of Canadian Screen Week, which began on May 28th. The kudos have been largely ignored by an American awards press that is already reading the tea leaves of 2025 following the announcement of the prestigious Palme D’Or awarded to American Sean Baker’s Anora at the Cannes Film Festival. It seems like a bit of an oversight, eh? To put this in context, the Toronto International Film Festival, held yearly in September, has become a launch point for the awards season, and a major stop for movies seeking Oscar buzz. How do the Canadian Screen Awards fit into the picture?

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HUMANE – Review by Justina Walford

How do I like my “humans are shitty” and “the world is ending” declarations? Served with a heaping mound of humor and a side of gore. Thank you, director Caitlin Cronenberg. In the not-so-distant future, the US is making population reduction voluntary without really making it voluntary. Humane is one night with one family dealing with the Department of Citizen Strategy crew which works like Amazon drivers, but instead of delivering $8 sweatpants with a quota for the day’s deliveries, this service picks up dead bodies on schedule and with numbers to meet.

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BLACKBERRY – Review by Alexandra Heller-Nicholas

While obviously an enormous hit and critical and commercial success, one of the most viscerally uncomfortable things about David Fincher’s The Social Network is how even before the film begins we know that the bad guys win: Facebook will become an enormous, zeitgeist-defining phenomena, and the patently unlikable Zuckerberg (played to perfection by Jesse Eisenberg) will become one of the richest men in the world. Less The Social Network’s rise-and-rise story, BlackBerry is a more classic rise-and-fall tale, and with that comes a degree of empathy that renders us perhaps more susceptible to the charms and quirks of the film’s central cast.

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BLACKBERRY – Review by Emma Badame

You’d be forgiven for thinking that the story of the sensational rise and fall of the first smartphone would make a better doc than drama, but director and co-writer Matt Johnson turns that theory on its head with the fabulous bio-comedy, and faux-documentary, BlackBerry. The proudly Canadian feature tells the home-grown story of Mike Lazaridis (Jay Baruchel) and Jim Balsillie (Glenn Howerton), the two men behind the spectacularly popular line of thumb-numbing mobile devices. It traces its beginnings at the Waterloo, Ontario-based tech company Research in Motion (RiM) to its impressive and catastrophic downfall, largely due to cocky business decisions and a failure to keep up in an ever-changing, fast-moving market.

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BLACKBERRY – Review by T.J. Callahan

BlackBerry is a techno savvy dramady inspired by true events, a story that starts with a look into the fraternity house ambience-like facility where the prototype of the new fangled smart phone was developed. White-wigged Jay Baruchel portrays the tech prodigy Mike Lazaridis and the perpetually red headbanded Matt Johnson, who wrote and directed the film, is the techo whiz’s best friend and the company’s co-founder Douglas Fregin. BlackBerry is The Social Network meets The Office. If Wally and the Beaver went on Shark Tank. It’s not a button-downed biopic, but is more of an entertaining rumpled rag tag look at a group of undeniable geniuses with more brains than social skills and financial savvy.

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