MUNICH – THE EDGE OF WAR – Review by Diane Carson

In Munich – The Edge of War German director Christian Schwochow dramatizes the September 1938 meeting of the top echelon of Germany and Italy, England and France leading to a non-aggression pact meant to ensure peace. The hope driving negotiations and self-delusion is that appeasement will satisfy Führer Adolf Hitler as he prepares to annex the Sudeten German territory of Czechoslovakia.

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HOUSE OF GUCCI – Review by Susan Granger

Ridley Scott’s extravagant melodrama House of Gucci delves into what led to the 1995 murder of Maurizio Gucci, scion of the Milan-based fashion family.

This sordid saga of love, backstabbing and betrayal begins as Patrizia Reggiani (Lady Gaga), an accountant at her father’s trucking company, sets her sights on bespectacled Maurizio Gucci (Adam Driver), whom she meets at a disco party. Although he’s smitten, his suave, snobbish father Rodolfo (Jeremy Irons) spots her as a crass, social-climbing gold-digger.

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HOUSE OF GUCCI – Review by Diane Carson

House of Gucci chronicles unpleasant events regarding this fashion brand. Based on Sara Gay Forden’s 2001 book The House of Gucci: A Sensational Story of Murder, Madness, Glamour, and Greed, the four elements emphasized in her title pinpoint the essence of the drama. Announced on screen as “inspired by true events,” it has, nevertheless, received extensive Gucci family criticism, the book and the film. No wonder, for no one comes off admirably depicted.

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BEING JULIA – Review by Martha Nochimson

Being Julia ( 2004) is a dazzling, fourteen year old romantic comedy whose time has come for a closer look. Based on a Somerset Maugham novella, Theatre, and set in 1938 London, at first glance it seems to be the essence of what has become offensive to progressive people. Successful British actress, Julia Lambert lives in a bubble of class privilege and audience adulation, to the exclusion of all else in society. But, don’t turn away. Being Julia offers an opportunity for feminists to mine unexpected gold and to examine our own prejudices and myopia.

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