PATRICIA ROZEMA on Celebrating her Career – Liz Braun interviews

Patricia Rozema, part of the Toronto New Wave of the 1980s and early 1990s, has been a force in filmmaking since her debut feature, I’ve Heard The Mermaids Singing, earned her immediate recognition. It was the first English-language Canadian film to win a prize at the Cannes Film Festival ― the Prix de la jeunesse in 1987 — and more than 35 years later, it is still regarded as one of the best Canadian movies extant. During the month of March the Toronto International Film Festival is honoring Rozema with a special film series. The trailblazing filmmaker — currently inspiring the next generation of filmmakers at UCLA’s School of Theater, Film & Television — is also being honored in L.A. and New York. We caught up with Rozema recently to talk about the TIFF series.

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CLOSE TO VERMEER – Review by Justina Walford

Suzanne Raes’ documentary,”Closer to Vermeer, delves into the enigmatic world of Johannes Vermeer, the celebrated painter behind masterpieces like “Girl with a Pearl Earring.” Little is truly known about the artist himself, and that mystery has been studied and debated by scholars as long as his art has been known. This documentary’s essential story is not about Vermeer as much as Vermeer is the framework to tell an even more riveting tale. As the camera pans so intimately close to Vermeer’s paint and canvas, we see the gloves and scopes of study, gently poring over every dab of paint.

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK May 5, 2023: CHILE ’76

A well-to-do Chilean woman’s comfortable life is turned upside down when her eyes are opened to the terrors of the Pinochet regime in Manuela Martelli’s tense, atmospheric Chile ’76. As Carmen (Aline Küppenheim, in a compelling performance) gets drawn into the fringes of the resistance through caring for an injured activist, she starts to realize just how precarious her protected existence really is — and begins to look at her world with new eyes.

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CHILE 76 – Review by Loren King

Actor turned director Manuela Martelli’s accomplished debut feature is a restrained slow burn of a political thriller. The film is anchored by a perfectly modulated performance by Aline Küppenheim as middle class housewife Carmen whose life has so far been shielded from the brutality of the Pinochet dictatorship in 1970s Chile. Carmen is more concerned with choosing the right color paint for her beach house than with the screams of an unseen woman in the street.

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CHILE ’76 – Review by Jennifer Merin

Chile ’76 is a powerful political thriller. This first feature by actor-turned-director Manuela Martelli, who also co-wrote the script with Alejandra Moffat, is set in the atmosphere of dread that swept over Chile during the 1970s as the repressive measures of the Pinochet dictatorship became harsher and harsher day by day. The compelling story centers on the political awakening of Carmen, an upper class a-political Chilean woman, the wife of a well-known physician, whose daily live revolves around family gatherings, shopping and lunching with friends — until she unintentionally becomes politicized.

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CHILE ’76 – Review by Cate Marquis

Set in Chile during the brutal, oppressive Pinochet dictatorship, Chile ’76 is a film that sneaks up on you, starting like a quiet drama about a wealthy woman who is satisfied with her settled life, but gradually morphing into a white-knuckle thriller about life under Pinochet. Aline Kuppenheim’s sensitive yet striking performance drives this thriller, as we are drawn into her world and her changing feelings. An impressive debut by a actor-turned-director Manuela Martelli, Chile ’76 is a chilling, powerful political thriller as a woman’s view of the world around her is shaken to its foundations in the film’s devastating conclusion.

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WEEK IN WOMEN: Annie Ernaux’s THE SUPER 8 YEARS docu lands at Kino Lorber – Brandy McDonnell reports

Kino Lorber has acquired from Totem Films all North American distribution rights to the intimate archival documentary The Super 8 Years, directed by Annie Ernaux and her son, David Ernaux-Briot. Ernaux is formally receiving the 2022 Nobel Prize for Literature this weekend in Stockholm, Sweden.

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AWFJ Zoom Interview with Nina Menkes and Maria Giese on BRAINWASHED: SEX-CAMERA-POWER (Exclusive)

Compiling nearly 200 clips since 1896 from popular, classic, and indie films, Brainwashed analyzes certain filmmaking techniques that continually view women as objects. Producer and cinema activist Maria Giese joins Nina to discuss the documentary and its implications with members of the Alliance of Women Film Journalists.

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AWFJ PRESENTS: Inaugural curated film series on KinoMarquee – Jennifer Merin reports

AWFJ PRESENTS, a curated film series that offers movie lovers access to great films by some of the world’s finest women directors, is streaming on demand on Kino Lorber’s digital platform KinoMarquee. Selected by a curatorial team of AWFJ members from Kino Lorber’s vast catalog of hundreds of important titles, the inaugural selections include exceptionally entertaining and relevant films by women directors.

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