PARASITE – TIFF19 Review by Alexandra Heller-Nicholas

The success of Parasite is not merely marked by great filmmaking and an intriguing storyline, but deep within its foundations lies an overwhelming understanding on Bong’s part of how bigotry operates at an almost molecular level. It’s everywhere. Parasite is a truly original black comedy about the tragic, casual normalization of the uneven terms upon which everyday class warfare is waged.

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BURNING – Review by Diane Carson

Happily for my taste, many films don’t rely on multi-million dollar budgets, flashy computer graphics, rapid-fire edits, loud explosions, and heart-stopping car chases in the service of superheroes. In alternative works, thought-provoking, carefully observed characters invite us into another person’s realm, often an individual so normal as to be unexamined and all but invisible in our own daily lives.

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TIFF18 Review: BURNING — Alexander Heller Nicholas

The blaze of admiration first sparked when Lee Chang-dong’s taut thriller Burning premiered at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival earlier this year where it competed in for the Palme d’Or and won the FIPRESCI Prize showed no signs of abating when it made its North American premiere in September at the Toronto International Film Festival.

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK, March 9, 2018: CLAIRE’S CAMERA

motw logo 1-35Claire’s Camera is Cannes-centric. Filmmaker Hong Sang-soo set his quirky, genre-defying drama in the sun-drenched seaside resort as the festival takes place, but never visits the event’s star-studded glamour or industry hustle that actually surrounded the film’s Cannes premiere in 2017. And, since the story is about friendship between two women, Claire’s Camera is femme-centric, too. Continue reading…

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Park Chan Wook Discusses Genre Twists in THIRST – Jennifer Merin interviews

park chan wook jerusalem ff cropped160At his Jerusalem Film Festival Masterclass, Korean filmmaker Park Chan Wook focuses on his genre bending storytelling and cinematic trickery in Thirst, which is, he says, his personal favorite of all the films he’s made to date. He comments that he identifies with the film’s central character, a priest-turned-vampire, because he’s always trying to justify his actions. He revelations about audience manipulation through sound design are particularly fascinating. Read more>>

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