LOVE LIES BLEEDING – Review by Sarah Vincent

Believe all the hype surrounding Love Lies Bleeding, a stylish, brutal, licentious visual feast set in November 1989 that infects a love story with a sick coating of criminal corruption. Stuck in a dead-end New Mexico town where the denizens range from seedy to rotting, Lou (Kristen Stewart) works as a gym manager at a dingy warehouse facility where hirsute, perspiring men dominate. Estranged from her father, Lou Sr. (Ed Harris), the owner of an outdoor gun range who resembles the Crypt Keeper, Lou seems resigned to cleaning up the messes around her and living in loneliness. So, when the golden, glowing muscular out-of-towner Jackie (Katy O’Brian) walks into her gym, Lou shoots her shot and scores. Oblivious to the dysfunctional family dynamics and Lou Sr.’s criminal operation, Jackie finds herself in the middle of a criminal underbelly enterprise that is the life blood of this community and becomes overwhelmed.

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WEEK IN WOMEN: Kristen Stewart honored at Sundance Gala – Brandy McDonnell reports

Academy Award-nominated performer Kristen Stewart is honored with the Visionary Award at the 2024 Sundance Film Festival’s fundraiser Opening Night Gala on Jan. 18, 2024, at the DeJoria Center in Utah. The annual gala enables the nonprofit Sundance Institute to raise critical funds to support independent artists year-round through labs, grants and public programming that nurture artists globally. Stewart will receive the Visionary Award in recognition of her work as an uncompromising artist and contributions to the field of independent film.

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WEEK IN WOMEN: Kristen Stewart named Berlinale Jury President – Brandy McDonnell reports

Oscar-nominated American actor, screenwriter and director Kristen Stewart will serve as the president of the International Jury at the 73rd Berlin International Film Festival. Stewart first attended the Berlin International Film Festival in 2010 with Welcome to the Rileys. She has just completed production on Love Me, as well as on Love Lies Bleeding, and is currently working on her feature-length directorial debut, the adaptation of Lidia Yuknavitch’s The Chronology of Water.

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SPENCER – Review by Diane Carson

As Princess Diana, Kristen Stewart gives a magnetic performance. Most impressive was her ability to capture Diana’s nonverbal subtleties and her verbal rhythms, to communicate her entrapment and then the release of dancing spontaneously, exuberantly. Stewart was asked to dance at the conclusion of many production days, and the editing together of this extemporaneous, free expression conveys what Diana has been suppressing.

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HAPPIEST SEASON – Review by Susan Granger

Don’t get me wrong. I’m all in favor of diversity and inclusiveness, but this lesbian update on Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner? doesn’t have a shred of believability. Since her parents died, Abigail – a.k.a. Abby (Kristen Stewart) – has never been into the holiday season. Despite that, her live-in girl-friend, Harper (Mackenzie Davis), impulsively insists that Abby come home with her to celebrate with her family.

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SEBERG – Review by Martha K Baker

Undoubtedly, the life and early death of Jean Seberg are worth recounting in film, the medium in which she made her mark. Would that the current biography of Seberg’s last years measure up to her life and death. It tries. It almost makes it, but, in the end, Seberg barely introduces Jean Seberg.

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SEBERG – Review by MaryAnn Johanson

The cat-and-mouse game that French New Wave icon Jean Seberg never realized she was playing with the FBI is the crux around which the confused Seberg pivots. By far the most compelling aspect of this limp, strangled attempt to merge the biopic with the paranoid thriller is the central performance by the always fascinating Kristen Stewart.

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REAL REEL WOMEN at TIFF 2019 – Report by Alexandra Heller-Nicholas

In the spirit of the AWFJ’s REAL REEL WOMEN project which showcases the breathtaking history of biopics about some of history’s most significant women, the 2019 Toronto International Film Festival includes an intriguing array of films that could comfortably be added to this formidable list, with a notable majority directed by women filmmakers.

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